“Jump Into Life in Your Second Adulthood, or ‘Now What?’”

Wednesday, January 10, 2018 | 3:00 to 5:00pm
Jump Into Life in Your Second Adulthood, or Now What?
Presentation for the Art of Aging/of Dying series
Admission $5
Hoffman Center for the Arts | 594 Laneda Ave, Manzanita

Please note this is a change to Wednesday. All of our Art of Aging/of Dying events will be on Wednesdays in 2018.

Are you at the stage of wondering, “Now what?” You’ve retired to the coast or retired from work already living here at the coast; you are living in an empty nest; you have renovated your dream home; you are new here and figuring out your place. And you are living your Second Adulthood, life after 50. For many of us, we get an entire second adulthood, not raising children or pursuing a career, so the question becomes “Now what?”

Join us to explore some of the goals and dreams you have either given up on or not quite yet clarified, and to figure out how to put those goals into action. Your goals can be in any area: physical, spiritual, social, mental, psychological, practical, creative.

This is an interactive workshop format rather than a discussion group. It will include researched information, a few exercises and some group brainstorming, so bring a pen and something to write on (notebook, magazine). Handout provided. If you attended Tela Skinner’s session on Priorities, you might want to review your notes from that day beforehand.

Prior to “retiring,” Kathie Hightower spent 26 years doing workshops in the corporate and government world, traveling the world the past 20+ years presenting workshops for military spouses, focused on happiness, stress/energy management, and especially on how to see possibilities in the face of many obstacles. Now she’s focusing her research on the topic of Second Adulthood, how to stay active, engaged, healthy and purposeful after 50, and yes, how to see possibilities when faced with obstacles of aging. Kathie last presented a workshop on the physical aspects of aging for Art of Aging.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Wednesday, January 10, 2018.  There is a $5 fee to attend.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information is available contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

 

Is the “Village Concept” viable for our villages? 

Report about the village concept
Tuesday, December 12 | 3:00 to 5:00pm
Fee $5.00
Art of Aging/of Dying series
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita 

 

Is the Village Concept viable for our villages? 

For several months, a steering committee has been investigating the possibilities for creation of a Village hub organization for our local communities. The Village steering committee includes both long-time and newer area residents.  Members of the committee will report their findings and ideas at the December 12th Art of Aging series, 3PM to 5PM at the Hoffman Center for the Arts.

What do we mean by “Village Concept?”

The Village concept is a model for organizing neighbors helping neighbors coordinate and deliver services for older adults so they can remain living in their own homes and active in their communities. A “Village” is a membership program that provides access to vetted professional services and to volunteer assistance, embracing a variety of preferences and needs. Typical Village services and volunteer opportunities include help with transportation, home repairs, household chores, yard chores, information referral and tech assistance.

As the majority residents in the villages of Neahkahnie, Manzanita, Nehalem and Wheeler are over the age of 55, and recognizing that some services older adults rely upon in urban areas are not available in our rural environment, a locally organized “village” service hub could improve the likelihood that residents will find ways to remain in the community.  While the model was developed with older adults in mind, the committee recognizes there are challenges for young adults who wish to live in our small communities, and that the Village model could provide for reciprocal services and support across generations.

“Nobody is completely independent. Sometimes in our lives we help a lot and we don’t need a lot in return. Other times we need a lot, and it’s okay to ask.”
— Mary Howe, Village Santa Cruz

“Health benefits are higher within Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) where physical and social environments facilitate greater activity and promote feelings of well-being.”
— Paul Masotti, PhD American Journal of Public Health July 2006

“Village members experience reduced isolation, increased independence, and enhanced purpose of life. These feet on the street resources, focused on social determinants of health, positively improve population health.”
—  Village to Village website

Find out what the steering committee has to report and how you can get involved in Village development.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, December 12, 2017.  There is a $5 fee to attend.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

Talking about Dying

“Talking about Dying”
Presentation by award-winning gerontologist Jenny Sasser
Art of Aging/of Dying series
Tuesday, November 28 | 3-5pm
Donations are welcome
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita

What do we think about when we think of dying? When we think about our own dying, what do we want most? This program provides an opportunity for participants to reflect on what stories and influences shape their thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members.

Thanks to the generous support of WRG Foundation Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation, Oregon Humanities offers Talking about Dying to communities throughout the state at no cost to hosts.

Jennifer (Jenny) Sasser, Ph.D. is an award-winning educational gerontologist, transdisciplinary scholar, and community activist. Jenny served as Chair of the Department of Human Sciences and Founding Director of Gerontology at Marylhurst University from 1999 to 2015.  In addition to co-authoring Aging: Concepts and Controversies with Harry Moody (now in its 9th edition), she is first author on the forthcoming book Gerontology: The basics. Her founded the Gero-Punk Project (www.geropunkproject.org) and offers consulting, workshops and presentations throughout North America.  She also teaches Adult Development and Aging; Supporting End-of-Life; and End-of-Life Practices in the Gerontology program at Portland Community College.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, November 28, 2017.  This event is free; however we welcome donations to the Art of Aging/of Dying program.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

 

Emergency Preparedness Presentation

Emergency Preparedness presentation
Art of Aging/of Dying
November 14 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita
Admission: $5

How prepared are you personally for local emergencies large or small in our town?

Come hear Emergency Volunteer Corp members Margaret Steele, M.D. and Linda Cook help us learn how to become better prepared for all types of emergencies.

They will discuss common emergencies such as short-term power outages, floods, trees down, as well as major emergencies like tornados and earthquake/tsunami as well as medical emergencies. Having seen the people affected by the recent floods, hurricanes and fires, this information is particularly timely.

Dr. Steele will help us understand medical aspects of emergency preparedness, including stockpiling at least 30 days of your medications, and how to personalize a First Aid Kit.

She will discuss basic health information, including important symptoms not to ignore, when to call 911, when to go to the ER or Urgent Care, and when to wait for a routine appointment with your doctor.

Linda Cook will show two examples of Go Bags and discuss how to supplement what you already have or to start new. She will also make suggestions as to what to have in needed supplies for Shelter in Place for longer-term emergencies.

They will be here to answer all your questions so that you will be able to leave feeling more empowered by learning what you need to do before the emergencies happen.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, November 14, 2017.  There is a $5 fee to attend.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

 

Kathleen Moore Presents Overview of Insights from Death Doula

Tuesday, October 24 | 3:00pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Ave | Manzanita

$5 fee to attend

Kathleen Moore will present an overview of insights from attending the Death Doula, Showing up for Death, Nourishing the World Conference.

Kathleen Moore will share insights learned from Ram Dass, Stephen Jenkinson, Bohdi Be, and many other very wise people at the April Death Doula Conference.

“WHAT IS A DEATH DOULA?” you might ask.  It is being with the dying.  It is knowing how to be quiet inside.  It is being of service to the family.  It is one of the most sacred things we can do.  Just as the birth of each new human being is sacred, so too is the passage, the birthing, of a soul out of their body.  Join us for an exploration and informative time together as we learn more about the role of being a Death Doula.

Kathleen Moore has attended the deaths of many throughout her life.  She faced her own death at age 10 when she developed Type 1 diabetes.  She became a child therapist in the schools, then opened her private practice over 30 years ago.  She worked many years at The Dougy Center for grieving children and families.  Kathleen has facilitated many grief groups, as well as individual grief sessions.  Death is a very natural extension of her love of life.

“The spiritual heart is the doorway to soul, which is the doorway to Soul-land,
that’s where I want to be.  It’s like Disneyland for the soul.”   — Ram Dass

“Na’ou – the gut feeling.  Hawaiians put big importance on our inner knowing.” — Bohdi Be

“Most people fear they’ll be in intense pain [when they are dying], but in reality, only very
few die that way….  Suffering and beauty are the two basic principles humans have capacity
to bring more life to us.”    — Stephen Jenkinson

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

“Priorities: Getting Clearer About What You Want for the Rest of Your Life”

Priorities
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita

What is most important to you as you age? What is your personal potential? How can you make choices to reflect the priorities in your life?

Tela Skinner will offer participants an opportunity to ponder questions designed to help them recognize what holds meaning in their individual lives now, and as they age.

According to Carl Jung, the tasks of late life are very different than those during youth and middle age. During this session we’ll look at how we each define those tasks and how to integrate them into our lives.

As a social science researcher, Tela interviewed hundreds of people in late life. She came to recognize the value of asking questions and digging deeper with each answer. Tela holds a Master’s degree in Interdisciplinary Studies/Gerontology. Her Master’s thesis on Gerotranscendence, a shift in perspective on the aging process, looks at how we, as aging humans, can re-evaluate our place in the world and our natural progression towards maturation and wisdom.

Participants will have a chance to think about different aspects of the aging process (physical, spiritual, social, mental, psychological, practical, creative). They will also take a closer look at what is working in their lives, and what isn’t. Participants will contemplate preferences and values and how they spend their resources (time, energy, money).

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, October 10, 2017.  There is a $5 fee to attend.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information  contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

 

What Everyone Needs to Know about Memory Loss

Art of Aging/of Dying series  Tuesday, September 12 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts | Admission is $5  

Have you ever wondered if your “senior moment” may actually be the beginning of something more serious?  Do you want to know the best way to relate to someone with memory loss?  Have you wondered what more you can do to prevent memory loss?  Learn the answers to these and other questions in a fun, interactive afternoon with videos, games and learning!

Janet Holboke, LCSW and June Longway, PMHNP, BC from Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GOBHI) will provide a practical update about memory loss: what we know, what you can do, and how to support people with dementia.

Participants will learn about the difference between normal memory loss and dementia, how behavior changes through the course of Alzheimer’s disease, strategies for relating to someone with memory loss and simple ways to test your memory.  We’ll review the effectiveness of prevention and treatment strategies such as nutritional supplements, brain games and medications.

Janet Holboke is an Older Adult Behavioral Health Specialist with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. based in The Dalles, Oregon.  Janet is one of 25 specialists around the state working as part of the Older Adult Behavioral Health Initiative.  This initiative sponsors community and professional education events promoting behavioral health awareness and improved services.

June Longway, PMHNP, BC is a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner with over 20 years experience in Behavioral Health working with the older population in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. She is currently working with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. and serves as a consultant.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, Sept 12, 2017.  There is a $5 fee to attend.  For more information, contact Janet Holboke at jholboke@gobhi.net

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

Local Hospice Services for our Community

Art of Aging/of Dying series
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Admission is $5

Local hospice clinical supervisor Patty Sorenson, RN, will present a program covering local hospice services available to our community. She’ll cover what the service offers families through one of the most difficult times of life.

Adventist Health Homecare of Tillamook has served all of Tillamook County for over 30 years with Hospice care. Hospice is a service to assist individuals, their families and caregivers through the final stages of life. Hospice is a service focused on assisting individuals who have elected to no longer seek curative treatment, but to remain as comfortable and active as possible in the time they have left. The Hospice team includes, MD/RN/MSW/HHA/Chaplain/Volunteer.

Patty Sorensen RN has been a part of our Hospice team for over 30 years and currently serves as clinical supervisor.

The other team members include the following.

Tahnee King MSW is new to the team and is available when needed to assist families through the sometimes difficult decisions and planning related to end of life care.

Therese L’Hommedieu RN, BSN has 27 years of experience in our community with Homecare and Hospice and is currently the case manager for North Tillamook County. She complements the Hospice team with her experience and knowledge base in end of life symptom control and her deep roots in our community.

DeeDee Haliski RN has been with Tillamook Hospice 13 years. Her experience and love of the people of our community make her the gentle, caring and skilled head nurse of the Hospice Program.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

You Are Here ~ Collaging about Life and Death


Art of Aging/of Dying series
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
Fee is $5

 

You Are Here:
Collaging about Life and Death, Fears & Revelations

Join us as we put tangible “art,” in the form of collage- making, into the Art of Aging and Dying conversations.

The Eclipse will have just passed. The light will have returned. We will continue our regular on-going conversations grappling with our own mortality and the inevitable passing away of those we love. Through the art of informal collaging we will each explore where we are in this on-going amazingly LIFE-enhancing process. Who knows what will be revealed. There will be time for sharing for those who want to.

Bring magazines for cutting up and special items to add to your own or others’ creations. We’ll have tag board to play on as well as scissors, glue and collage materials.

Fee is $5. We suggest an extra few dollars for materials.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave).

For more information contact Lane deMoll at lane@nehalemtel.net

 

 

The Shamanic Aspects of Death

“The Shamanic Aspects of Death:
How Other Cultures Approach Death’s Mysteries”

– a presentation by Lane deMoll for the Art of Aging/of Dying series

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita
Fee is $5

 Death is a mystery that our culture has not dealt with very well. In fact we tend to “sweep it under the rug” as if by not talking about it, death will somehow not touch us personally. This has not served us, and may, in fact, be the root of a lot of psychological and social problems.

How do “native” shamanic cultures live with the knowledge of death and in many cases actually prepare themselves to die? There are those in Andean and Amazonian South America and Central America and Africa as well as India and other Buddhist & Hindu countries who treat death very differently than we do. So did the ancient Egyptians. Partly their perspectives and experience lie in their understanding that the soul lives on and returns to this world over and over. And partly it’s because they practice their deaths via initiation rites, vision quests, shamanic journeying, yoga asanas and more.

Join in a conversation with Lane deMoll who has been exploring this question for the past twenty years, especially in her visits to tombs and temples of ancient Egypt and on shamanic journeys to Peru, Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Lane deMoll at lane@nehalemtel.net