Talking about Dying

“Talking about Dying”
Presentation by award-winning gerontologist Jenny Sasser
Art of Aging/of Dying series
Tuesday, November 28 | 3-5pm
Donations are welcome
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita

What do we think about when we think of dying? When we think about our own dying, what do we want most? This program provides an opportunity for participants to reflect on what stories and influences shape their thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members.

Thanks to the generous support of WRG Foundation Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation, Oregon Humanities offers Talking about Dying to communities throughout the state at no cost to hosts.

Jennifer (Jenny) Sasser, Ph.D. is an award-winning educational gerontologist, transdisciplinary scholar, and community activist. Jenny served as Chair of the Department of Human Sciences and Founding Director of Gerontology at Marylhurst University from 1999 to 2015.  In addition to co-authoring Aging: Concepts and Controversies with Harry Moody (now in its 9th edition), she is first author on the forthcoming book Gerontology: The basics. Her founded the Gero-Punk Project (www.geropunkproject.org) and offers consulting, workshops and presentations throughout North America.  She also teaches Adult Development and Aging; Supporting End-of-Life; and End-of-Life Practices in the Gerontology program at Portland Community College.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, October 24, 2017.  This event is free; however we welcome donations to the Art of Aging/of Dying program.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

 

Emergency Preparedness Presentation

Emergency Preparedness presentation
Art of Aging/of Dying
November 14 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita
Admission: $5

How prepared are you personally for local emergencies large or small in our town?

Come hear Emergency Volunteer Corp members Margaret Steele, M.D. and Linda Cook help us learn how to become better prepared for all types of emergencies.

They will discuss common emergencies such as short-term power outages, floods, trees down, as well as major emergencies like tornados and earthquake/tsunami as well as medical emergencies. Having seen the people affected by the recent floods, hurricanes and fires, this information is particularly timely.

Dr. Steele will help us understand medical aspects of emergency preparedness, including stockpiling at least 30 days of your medications, and how to personalize a First Aid Kit.

She will discuss basic health information, including important symptoms not to ignore, when to call 911, when to go to the ER or Urgent Care, and when to wait for a routine appointment with your doctor.

Linda Cook will show two examples of Go Bags and discuss how to supplement what you already have or to start new. She will also make suggestions as to what to have in needed supplies for Shelter in Place for longer-term emergencies.

They will be here to answer all your questions so that you will be able to leave feeling more empowered by learning what you need to do before the emergencies happen.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, November 14, 2017.  There is a $5 fee to attend.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

 

Kathleen Moore Presents Overview of Insights from Death Doula

Tuesday, October 24 | 3:00pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Ave | Manzanita

$5 fee to attend

Kathleen Moore will present an overview of insights from attending the Death Doula, Showing up for Death, Nourishing the World Conference.

Kathleen Moore will share insights learned from Ram Dass, Stephen Jenkinson, Bohdi Be, and many other very wise people at the April Death Doula Conference.

“WHAT IS A DEATH DOULA?” you might ask.  It is being with the dying.  It is knowing how to be quiet inside.  It is being of service to the family.  It is one of the most sacred things we can do.  Just as the birth of each new human being is sacred, so too is the passage, the birthing, of a soul out of their body.  Join us for an exploration and informative time together as we learn more about the role of being a Death Doula.

Kathleen Moore has attended the deaths of many throughout her life.  She faced her own death at age 10 when she developed Type 1 diabetes.  She became a child therapist in the schools, then opened her private practice over 30 years ago.  She worked many years at The Dougy Center for grieving children and families.  Kathleen has facilitated many grief groups, as well as individual grief sessions.  Death is a very natural extension of her love of life.

“The spiritual heart is the doorway to soul, which is the doorway to Soul-land,
that’s where I want to be.  It’s like Disneyland for the soul.”   — Ram Dass

“Na’ou – the gut feeling.  Hawaiians put big importance on our inner knowing.” — Bohdi Be

“Most people fear they’ll be in intense pain [when they are dying], but in reality, only very
few die that way….  Suffering and beauty are the two basic principles humans have capacity
to bring more life to us.”    — Stephen Jenkinson

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

“Priorities: Getting Clearer About What You Want for the Rest of Your Life”

Priorities
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita

What is most important to you as you age? What is your personal potential? How can you make choices to reflect the priorities in your life?

Tela Skinner will offer participants an opportunity to ponder questions designed to help them recognize what holds meaning in their individual lives now, and as they age.

According to Carl Jung, the tasks of late life are very different than those during youth and middle age. During this session we’ll look at how we each define those tasks and how to integrate them into our lives.

As a social science researcher, Tela interviewed hundreds of people in late life. She came to recognize the value of asking questions and digging deeper with each answer. Tela holds a Master’s degree in Interdisciplinary Studies/Gerontology. Her Master’s thesis on Gerotranscendence, a shift in perspective on the aging process, looks at how we, as aging humans, can re-evaluate our place in the world and our natural progression towards maturation and wisdom.

Participants will have a chance to think about different aspects of the aging process (physical, spiritual, social, mental, psychological, practical, creative). They will also take a closer look at what is working in their lives, and what isn’t. Participants will contemplate preferences and values and how they spend their resources (time, energy, money).

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, October 10, 2017.  There is a $5 fee to attend.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information  contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

 

What Everyone Needs to Know about Memory Loss

Art of Aging/of Dying series  Tuesday, September 12 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts | Admission is $5  

Have you ever wondered if your “senior moment” may actually be the beginning of something more serious?  Do you want to know the best way to relate to someone with memory loss?  Have you wondered what more you can do to prevent memory loss?  Learn the answers to these and other questions in a fun, interactive afternoon with videos, games and learning!

Janet Holboke, LCSW and June Longway, PMHNP, BC from Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GOBHI) will provide a practical update about memory loss: what we know, what you can do, and how to support people with dementia.

Participants will learn about the difference between normal memory loss and dementia, how behavior changes through the course of Alzheimer’s disease, strategies for relating to someone with memory loss and simple ways to test your memory.  We’ll review the effectiveness of prevention and treatment strategies such as nutritional supplements, brain games and medications.

Janet Holboke is an Older Adult Behavioral Health Specialist with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. based in The Dalles, Oregon.  Janet is one of 25 specialists around the state working as part of the Older Adult Behavioral Health Initiative.  This initiative sponsors community and professional education events promoting behavioral health awareness and improved services.

June Longway, PMHNP, BC is a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner with over 20 years experience in Behavioral Health working with the older population in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. She is currently working with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. and serves as a consultant.

The event will be held at Hoffman Center for the Arts; 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, OR from 3-5 pm on Tuesday, Sept 12, 2017.  There is a $5 fee to attend.  For more information, contact Janet Holboke at jholboke@gobhi.net

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

Local Hospice Services for our Community

Art of Aging/of Dying series
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Admission is $5

Local hospice clinical supervisor Patty Sorenson, RN, will present a program covering local hospice services available to our community. She’ll cover what the service offers families through one of the most difficult times of life.

Adventist Health Homecare of Tillamook has served all of Tillamook County for over 30 years with Hospice care. Hospice is a service to assist individuals, their families and caregivers through the final stages of life. Hospice is a service focused on assisting individuals who have elected to no longer seek curative treatment, but to remain as comfortable and active as possible in the time they have left. The Hospice team includes, MD/RN/MSW/HHA/Chaplain/Volunteer.

Patty Sorensen RN has been a part of our Hospice team for over 30 years and currently serves as clinical supervisor.

The other team members include the following.

Tahnee King MSW is new to the team and is available when needed to assist families through the sometimes difficult decisions and planning related to end of life care.

Therese L’Hommedieu RN, BSN has 27 years of experience in our community with Homecare and Hospice and is currently the case manager for North Tillamook County. She complements the Hospice team with her experience and knowledge base in end of life symptom control and her deep roots in our community.

DeeDee Haliski RN has been with Tillamook Hospice 13 years. Her experience and love of the people of our community make her the gentle, caring and skilled head nurse of the Hospice Program.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

You Are Here ~ Collaging about Life and Death


Art of Aging/of Dying series
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
Fee is $5

 

You Are Here:
Collaging about Life and Death, Fears & Revelations

Join us as we put tangible “art,” in the form of collage- making, into the Art of Aging and Dying conversations.

The Eclipse will have just passed. The light will have returned. We will continue our regular on-going conversations grappling with our own mortality and the inevitable passing away of those we love. Through the art of informal collaging we will each explore where we are in this on-going amazingly LIFE-enhancing process. Who knows what will be revealed. There will be time for sharing for those who want to.

Bring magazines for cutting up and special items to add to your own or others’ creations. We’ll have tag board to play on as well as scissors, glue and collage materials.

Fee is $5. We suggest an extra few dollars for materials.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave).

For more information contact Lane deMoll at lane@nehalemtel.net

 

 

The Shamanic Aspects of Death

“The Shamanic Aspects of Death:
How Other Cultures Approach Death’s Mysteries”

– a presentation by Lane deMoll for the Art of Aging/of Dying series

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita
Fee is $5

 Death is a mystery that our culture has not dealt with very well. In fact we tend to “sweep it under the rug” as if by not talking about it, death will somehow not touch us personally. This has not served us, and may, in fact, be the root of a lot of psychological and social problems.

How do “native” shamanic cultures live with the knowledge of death and in many cases actually prepare themselves to die? There are those in Andean and Amazonian South America and Central America and Africa as well as India and other Buddhist & Hindu countries who treat death very differently than we do. So did the ancient Egyptians. Partly their perspectives and experience lie in their understanding that the soul lives on and returns to this world over and over. And partly it’s because they practice their deaths via initiation rites, vision quests, shamanic journeying, yoga asanas and more.

Join in a conversation with Lane deMoll who has been exploring this question for the past twenty years, especially in her visits to tombs and temples of ancient Egypt and on shamanic journeys to Peru, Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Lane deMoll at lane@nehalemtel.net

Carolyn Wood, author of Tough Girl, will discuss Aging Adventures

Carolyn Wood, author of Tough Girl:
An Olympian’s Journey will discuss Aging Adventures: Overcoming Obstacles
Tuesday, August 8 | 3 to 5pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita
Admittance fee is $5 

 

Carolyn will read from her book Tough Girl and lead a discussion about aging adventures, going for new (or old) dreams and creating a practice that supports those dreams.

Carolyn will share thoughts about aging, readings from her journals along the Camino related to aging, “coming to terms with being alone and being frightened of being alone.” She’ll raise ideas of the value of “practice,” what we choose to practice we get good at. What are you choosing?

Carolyn will share a short writing prompt for participants to write down their own dreams of activities/trips they still want to pursue.

Carolyn Wood is living a life worth reading about.  An Olympic swimming champion at age 14 and a slowly emerging gay person in an earlier, less understanding era, she has been resolutely the “Tough Girl” of her book title.  Beautifully written, the book artfully weaves her life story around the tale of her long walk on the Camino de Santiago, an effort to understand and accept the end of a decades-long marriage.   This memoir could easily become a favorite of  American literature teachers and their students.    —George Vogt, Retired Executive Director, Oregon Historical Society

A life long Oregonian, Carolyn grew up in southwest Portland and attended Beaverton High School.  In the summer of her freshman year she competed and won a gold medal in swimming at the 1960 summer Olympics in Rome.  She raced nationally and internationally for three more years before attending the University of Oregon.

After graduation in 1967, Carolyn began a thirty-five year career teaching high school English, first at her alma mater, then at Lake Oswego, Glencoe and Wilson high schools.  During that time she earned a Masters of Social Work and an MS Education from Portland State University.  A fellow of the Oregon Writing Project, Carolyn wrote with her students over the years, attended writing workshops and retreats, published a poem here and an essay there and promised herself that someday she’d “pull those writings together and tell her story.”  In 2010 she began to write TOUGH GIRL: An Olympian’s Journey, her first book.

Even though Carolyn remains deeply rooted in Oregon, life’s journeys have taken her far:  working as governess for the Robert Kennedy family the year after the senator’s murder, backpacking throughout the Oregon and Washington Cascades, exploring Europe, Africa, India and Asia, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, trekking in the Himalayas and Alps, walking a thousand miles across France and Spain on the Camino de Santiago.  Volunteer work after retirement with Habitat for Humanity International, Medical Teams Northwest (Mexico), Wilderness Volunteers, and Coffee Creek Corrections have furthered her education.  These days her explorations include yoga and meditation as well as gardening and bee keeping.

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information Kathie Hightower at kathiejhightower@gmail.com

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

 

The Stuff of Family Life

Thursday, July 20 2017 | 4 to 6pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts 

“The Stuff of Family Life: How Our Homes Reflect Our Lives: Sociologist Shows What Your Underwear Drawer Can Reveal About You” special presentation for the Art of Aging/of Dying series 

In a special event sociologist Michelle Janning will continue the discussion Mary Ruhl started about the significance of objects in our lives. The event is part of the Art of Aging/of Dying series and will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Admission fee is $5.

Sociology Professor Michelle Janning offers a timely look at how modern society and technology shapes our relationships and our lives. Like an archaeologist studying ancient civilizations through the things they left behind, Janning excavates contemporary life through our houses and possessions, from childhood stuffed animals and security blankets to retirement homes and senior living centers.

Janning takes readers through the stages of life – from dating and marriage to parenting and aging – that are usually kept behind closed doors. From online valentines to the growing popularity of “man caves,” The Stuff of Family Life looks not only at what large demographic studies say about family dynamics but also what our lives—and the stuff in them—say about how we relate to each other.

Janning has joked, “I am not a sociologist who uses large national datasets to illustrate family life; I’m the sociologist who asks people to examine what’s in their underwear drawers and living rooms to tell stories about their family life.” Using amusing anecdotes, as well as drawing on pop culture, economics, interior design, gender studies and more, Janning combines the educational with the entertaining to make The Stuff of Family Life accessible to both casual readers and dedicated students of sociology.

Michelle Janning is professor of sociology at Whitman College. A board member of the Council on Contemporary Families, she specializes in family and gender studies and cultural sociology. She has conducted numerous community-based projects, given keynote presentations, and performed consultancies that have given her a deeper understanding of the everyday lives of different types of families. Her work has been published in academic sources such as the Journal of Family Issues and the Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, and she has been quoted in popular media such as Women’s Health and Real Simple.

For more information contact Kathie Hightower at kathiejhightower@gmail.com

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). Further information is available at www.hoffmanblog.org online or contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com