Word & Image Event Showcases

Word & Image Event Showcases
Saturday, August 26 | 7 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts

 

Word & Image is a summer exhibit at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita, which pairs artists and writers to create original work, each in
response to the other’s.

Join us at 7pm Saturday, August 26 at the Hoffman Center for the Arts to view the results of this unique creative experience, one that co-organizers Emily Ransdell and Andy Barker call “silent collaboration.” Twelve artists and twelve writers drew names, and have created art and writing in response to each other’s creative work.

At the event, you’ll view original art, listen to original readings responding to art and have a chance to purchase broadsides of the collaborations along with a keepsake book of all the creative results. Suggested donation for the event is $5.

For those who cannot attend the launch evening, Hoffman Center for the Arts Gallery will be open every Friday and Saturday, from 3 to 5pm, to view the broadsides. The gallery show will run through the end of September.

“We piloted this project two summers ago,” Ransdell explains.  “Writing in response to art has been popular for centuries — we thought it would be fun for artists to have their turn as well, creating art in response to writing.”

“It turned out to be a great experience for the participants,” Ransdell adds, “Unlike a more typical themed show, the concept of response art and writing enabled each participant to both showcase their own personal style and to connect with others through interpreting each other’s work. People explored new mediums and methods with wonderful results.”

Participants were selected via a blind submission process, with judging by a group of past Word & Image participants as well as participants in Manzanita Writers’ weekly Writers’ Lounge. Judges for writing included Bob Balmer, Kathryn Stock and Phyllis Mannan. Judges for art included Karen Gale, Cathi Howell and Scott Wilson.

“By limiting participants to 12 writers and artists, we make sure we give all the participants the space and time for their work to be represented well,” Ransdell said. “And we want the community participation to be as broad and diverse as possible.  There is so much talent in our area.”

The Hoffman’s Word and Image project is open to all artists and writers who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area.

Ransdell is a poet with an MFA in Creative Writing.  She is a 2016 Pushcart Prize Nominee and was a finalist for the 2016 Rattle Poetry Prize.  She serves as co-chair of the Manzanita PoetryFest and divides her time between Manzanita and Camas, Wa.

Barker taught creative writing as a high school English teacher for over 30 years before retiring two years ago. His stories have appeared in journals including the Oregon publications Rain Magazine and The North Coast Squid. He also serves as team leader for The North Coast Squid.

Word & Image is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue.) For more information contact Emily Ransdell at emilyransdell@yahoo.com

The Shamanic Aspects of Death

“The Shamanic Aspects of Death:
How Other Cultures Approach Death’s Mysteries”

– a presentation by Lane deMoll for the Art of Aging/of Dying series

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 | 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita
Fee is $5

 Death is a mystery that our culture has not dealt with very well. In fact we tend to “sweep it under the rug” as if by not talking about it, death will somehow not touch us personally. This has not served us, and may, in fact, be the root of a lot of psychological and social problems.

How do “native” shamanic cultures live with the knowledge of death and in many cases actually prepare themselves to die? There are those in Andean and Amazonian South America and Central America and Africa as well as India and other Buddhist & Hindu countries who treat death very differently than we do. So did the ancient Egyptians. Partly their perspectives and experience lie in their understanding that the soul lives on and returns to this world over and over. And partly it’s because they practice their deaths via initiation rites, vision quests, shamanic journeying, yoga asanas and more.

Join in a conversation with Lane deMoll who has been exploring this question for the past twenty years, especially in her visits to tombs and temples of ancient Egypt and on shamanic journeys to Peru, Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Lane deMoll at lane@nehalemtel.net

Three Potters ~ Three Perspectives 

Ceramic Art of 3 North Coast Potters

Barry Calvarese, Shane Sjogren, and Steven Gibson
Artists’ Reception August 4 | 3-5
Show continues Fridays & Saturdays  | 3-5 through August 27
Hoffman Gallery | 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita

The ceramic art of North Coast Potters Barry Calvarese, Shane Sjogren, and Steven Gibson
will be featured and available for purchase during the month of August
at the Hoffman Gallery, 594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita.

Show opens with an artists’ reception on August 4 from 3-5
and continues every Friday and Saturday from 3-5 through August 27

 

 

POP-UP Pottery Sale

Pottery on the Porch
July 29 | 10-4
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita
One day only

Local clay artists will sell their works in the Hoffman Gallery and on the front porch of the Hoffman Center. Meet the makers and buy unique and hand-made pottery directly from the artist!

The Stuff of Family Life

Thursday, July 20 2017 | 4 to 6pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts 

“The Stuff of Family Life: How Our Homes Reflect Our Lives: Sociologist Shows What Your Underwear Drawer Can Reveal About You” special presentation for the Art of Aging/of Dying series 

In a special event sociologist Michelle Janning will continue the discussion Mary Ruhl started about the significance of objects in our lives. The event is part of the Art of Aging/of Dying series and will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Admission fee is $5.

Sociology Professor Michelle Janning offers a timely look at how modern society and technology shapes our relationships and our lives. Like an archaeologist studying ancient civilizations through the things they left behind, Janning excavates contemporary life through our houses and possessions, from childhood stuffed animals and security blankets to retirement homes and senior living centers.

Janning takes readers through the stages of life – from dating and marriage to parenting and aging – that are usually kept behind closed doors. From online valentines to the growing popularity of “man caves,” The Stuff of Family Life looks not only at what large demographic studies say about family dynamics but also what our lives—and the stuff in them—say about how we relate to each other.

Janning has joked, “I am not a sociologist who uses large national datasets to illustrate family life; I’m the sociologist who asks people to examine what’s in their underwear drawers and living rooms to tell stories about their family life.” Using amusing anecdotes, as well as drawing on pop culture, economics, interior design, gender studies and more, Janning combines the educational with the entertaining to make The Stuff of Family Life accessible to both casual readers and dedicated students of sociology.

Michelle Janning is professor of sociology at Whitman College. A board member of the Council on Contemporary Families, she specializes in family and gender studies and cultural sociology. She has conducted numerous community-based projects, given keynote presentations, and performed consultancies that have given her a deeper understanding of the everyday lives of different types of families. Her work has been published in academic sources such as the Journal of Family Issues and the Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, and she has been quoted in popular media such as Women’s Health and Real Simple.

For more information contact Kathie Hightower at kathiejhightower@gmail.com

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). Further information is available at www.hoffmanblog.org online or contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

 

Exploring the Significance of Objects in Our Lives

“The Things We Keep: Exploring the Significance of Objects in Our Lives
Art of Aging/of Dying series
Hof
fman Center for the Arts in Manzanita
Tuesday | July 11 2017 | 3 to 5pm

Mary Ruhl will guide us into and through a discussion about how our valued possessions hold meaning for us through life transitions. The event is part of the Art of Aging/of Dying series and will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Admission fee is $5.

Many of us have experienced changes in our recent lives, moving to a new home, a new town, or the loss of loved ones. Often these changes require us to sort through our “stuff” or someone else’s. Faced with decisions about emotional, historical, family and economic value of objects, how do we decide which to keep, which to part with? What are the significant stories attached to some of these objects, and how might we capture these stories?

You are invited to bring a “keeper” object that has meaning in your life, and to share the story attached to it with the group. As time allows, we will discuss ideas about making downsizing decisions, considering the value of possessions and archiving family stories around these significant objects.

“ We find it familiar to consider objects as useful or aesthetic, as necessities or vain indulgences. We are on less familiar ground when we consider objects as companions to our emotional lives or as provocations to thought.”
– Sherry Turkle, Evocative Objects: Things we Think With

Mary Ruhl downsized homes twice before moving to Manzanita three years ago. She holds a Master’s degree in Interdisciplinary Studies/Gerontology. Mary’s Master’s thesis work investigated the question of whether cherished personal objects support identity for persons transitioning to assisted living. Before retirement, she was a research assistant at OHSU’s Layton Center for Aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Previous to her work as a gerontologist, Mary was a graphic designer, photo art director and photo stylist – arranging objects, text and images to impart meaning and messages.

  If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). Further information is available at www.hoffmanblog.org online or contact Tela Skinner, at telaskinner@gmail.com

For more information contact Mary Ruhl, cardoons@nehalemtel.net.

 

The ALIVE INSIDE movie — Art of Dying Series

ART OF AGING/OF DYING SERIES
ALIVE INSIDE
Tuesday 27 June | 3pm

Hoffman Center 

Michael Rossato-Bennett’s movie ALIVE INSIDE will be shown at 3:00 on Tuesday, 27 June at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Admission is $5. There will be a discussion following.

ALIVE INSIDE is the documentary about Dan Cohen’s amazing work of giving Alzheimer’s and dementia people music from their youth. Some instantly came back to our reality and were able to reconnect with loved ones. Some got up out of their wheelchairs and began to dance around the room. Some who rarely talked began to sing beautifully. Michael Rossato-Bennett does an excellent job of honoring these elders and their liberator, telling the story with many examples of the revitalizing power of music from one’s youth. Alive Inside was the most awarded documentary of 2014.

“ Gloriously inspirational” – Duane Byrge, The Hollywood Reporter.
“Alive Inside is a life changing film.” – Willian Brownbridge, Toronto Film Scene.“Joyous and unexpectedly uplifting.” – Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times.

We will have a discussion afterward lead by Kathleen Moore, therapist and grief counselor. Our Art of Dying discussions are always lively and interesting.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/Art of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held
at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave).

For more information contact Kathleen Moore at moorewagner@nehalemtel.net.

Los Samaritanos: A Presentation on June 14, 2017

Los Samaritanos
A healing presence along the border, presentation by Gail Frank

Wednesday, June 14, 7 pm, Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita

Free of Charge

Gail B. Frank

Gail Frank is a long time resident of the Oregon Coast. For over ten years, she wrote a monthly column for the North Coast Citizen on the joys of life in a small town. She often presents writing workshops in Manzanita for aspiring writers and was a director of stage plays for the Coaster Theatre Playhouse in Cannon Beach for many years.

When Gail began spending winters in Green Valley, Arizona, forty miles from the U.S./Mexico border, she became intrigued by the Green Valley/Sahuarita Samaritans, a group whose mission is to “save human lives in the Southern Arizona desert.”

When I attended my first Samaritan meeting, I expected to find seven people in a small room talking about how to help migrants. Instead I found 75 people, almost all of them over 60 years of age who were searching the desert to give water, food and first aid to people who were fleeing violence in their homeland, looking for a better life or trying to reunite with their families in the United States.  Imagine, little old ladies in tennis shoes tromping around the desert in 100-degree heat calling out “hola, somos amigos,´¿necessita ayuda.”

Established in 2005 to be a complement to the Tucson Samaritans, the Green Valley/Sahuarita Samaritans engage in desert searches and water drops. They also help with the Kino Border Initiative aid station, El Comedor, which serves deported migrants two meals a day in Nogales, Sonora for a few weeks until they decide what to do next. Samaritans serve as witnesses at Operation Streamline court proceedings which take place every weekday afternoon in Tucson. The fast track court system was originally designed to serve as a deterrent with a goal of zero tolerance for illegal entry. Multiple studies show it is a program that does not achieve its goal and instead splits up families and costs taxpayers enormous amounts of money to keep migrants in mostly private prison systems.

Gail will share experiences of her work at El Comidor as well as her observations of Operation Streamline. In her efforts to put a “human face” on the complex issue of immigration, Gail will use photographs, her own writings and that of others, and found objects from migrant trails. She will provide resources on where to learn more and what one can do to help in this humanitarian effort.  Books on Borderland Issues will be available for purchase.

Financial contributions for the Samaritans will be accepted and appreciated. Samaritans is run by volunteers and funded entirely by donations. Any money raised will be used to provide water, food, blankets, clothing and first aid for migrants as well as gasoline and maintenance for search and water vehicles.  Gail’s belief is that “they” are not coming to save us; it is up to us. We are they, the ones we’ve been waiting for.

 

Member and Donor Brunch on Sunday, April 23

Join fellow members and donors of the Hoffman Center for the Arts for brunch on April 23rd from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Choose from a variety of tasty home made breakfast items and get to know others in the community who care about the arts.

Board president Vera Wildauer will present an overview of the accomplishments of 2016, as well as highlights and plans for this year.  Plus, there will be door prizes!

Please let us know if you’re coming so our culinary volunteers can prepare enough for everyone by emailing hoffmancenter@nehalemtel.net.

Pilgrimage: Photos and Stories of The Refugee Crisis in Greece on April 17

A Manzanita woman has been an up-close witness to the humanitarian crisis that has washed upon the shores of a Greek island — 6,200 hundred miles from the Oregon coast — the first, safe haven for tens of thousands of refugees desperately fleeing the death, destruction, and tragedy of civil and other warfare in the Middle East.

Mindi Bender, a retired special education teacher from Michigan, made it her mission to help however she could last year when she visited friends on the island of Lesvos. The island lies in the eastern Aegean Sea, facing the Turkish coast. At the closest point, the two landmasses are only 3.4 miles apart. That proximity has made the island a logical destination for refugees and economic migrants.

Bender will share her experiences — in pictures and words — with fellow Oregonians before she returns to Greece later this month. “Pilgrimage: Photos and Stories of The Refugee Crisis in Greece” will be presented Monday, Apr. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita.

Bender first learned of the refugee crisis in 2015. “I have visited Lesvos since 1989 for yoga retreats,” said Bender. “I love the people of Lesvos. Their economy and the tourist industry in Molivos village have been decimated by this crisis.”

Before international aid organizations arrived in the autumn of 2015, the local Greeks were dealing with the flood of refugees.

“The wider world didn’t take notice until media carried pictures of a drowned toddler washing ashore. I saw some online video footage recorded by someone I knew there who was dealing with the search and rescue efforts daily,” she said. “I recognized my favorite places all along the shoreline, and felt deeply called to go there and be of service. I found several local and international humanitarian aid groups accepting volunteers.”

Bender spent three months on Lesvos last spring, working with the local community, helping with the environmental clean-up effort, and volunteering with a humanitarian organization in a refugee camp. She also taught an English language class to refugee children from several different countries.

Bender hopes her presentation will give a human perspective on what has been happening. She will share photos, tell some stories, and have a variety of news articles to peruse. “I want to share the beauty of the people I met there. I want to personalize this crisis,” she said. “These are beautiful human beings living in dire circumstances, hoping to start new lives in safe places.”

The presentation in Manzanita will be free of charge.

Financial contributions will be accepted and greatly appreciated. All donations will be used to purchase a variety of necessary goods, educational materials, medical supplies, etc., and will be selectively distributed to directly benefit refugees and trusted organizations.