Screening of “The Maestro”

The Maestro
Friday, July 28 | 7:30 pm
Admission $5

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2016 Portland-made independent feature film.

The film tells the story of Felix Kruger, a contemporary eccentric young classical composer commissioned to write his first major ballet. His struggles with writer’s block and a drinking problem, however, jeopardize his music and threaten to destroy his relationship with his girlfriend and those around him.

Through a series of eye opening events, his music begins to reflect his own inner journey and transformation. It is also through the mentorship of his good friend Leonard, a 65-year-old retiree, and a surprising secret that Kruger discovers the power and importance of life’s simple things.

“The Maestro” was written and directed by David Lunday. He also stars in the movie, along with Dennis Fitzpatrick, Haley Talbot, and Robert Projansky.

Lunday is a composer himself, and has scored feature films, documentaries, instructional DVDs, and iPhone apps for over 15 years.

“The Maestro” was an official Selection for the 2016 Madrid International Film Festival and the Los Angeles CineFest. It lasts 86 minutes.

View trailer here

 

 

 

 

Film Series Screens “The Maestro” on Friday, July 28, 2017

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2016 Portland-made independent feature film “The Maestro” Friday, July 28 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

The film tells the story of Felix Kruger, a contemporary eccentric young classical composer commissioned to write his first major ballet. His struggles with writer’s block and a drinking problem, however, jeopardize his music and threaten to destroy his relationship with his girlfriend and those around him.

Through a series of eye opening events, his music begins to reflect his own inner journey and transformation. It is also through the mentorship of his good friend Leonard, a 65-year-old retiree, and a surprising secret that Kruger discovers the power and importance of life’s simple things.

“The Maestro” was written and directed by David Lunday. He also stars in the movie, along with Dennis Fitzpatrick, Haley Talbot, and Robert Projansky.

Lunday is a composer himself, and has scored feature films, documentaries, instructional DVDs, and iPhone apps for over 15 years.

“The Maestro” was an official Selection for the 2016 Madrid International Film Festival and the Los Angeles CineFest. It lasts 86 minutes.

A trailer can be viewed at http://www.lundaypictures.com/#trailer

 

 

 

 

Film Series Screens The Curio on June 23, 2017

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2015 feature comedy/narrative film “The Curio” Friday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

Filmed in Portland and directed by Dicky Dahl, the 88-minute movie is Dahl’s take on the conflicting demands of a struggling filmmaker trying to raise a family while at the same time following the path of an artist.

Dicky, his ex-wife, parents and brothers appear as themselves in the film, as scripted material, footage from the director’s married life, and interviews with family and friends paint the picture of a somewhat misguided late-bloomer experiencing all the freedom, loneliness and humiliation that come with having to start over when the bloom is off the rose.

“The Curio” is Dahl’s first feature film. His cinematographer was Scott Ballard, a number of whose  films have been previously shown at the Hoffman Center, including “Death on a Rock,” “A Standing Still,” and “The Black Sea.”

A trailer can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/68810889.

Center to Screen Comedy/Drama “Calvin Marshall”

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2009 feature comedy/drama “Calvin Marshall”) Friday, May 19 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

The film tells the story of college student who is determined to become a Major League Baseball player, but finds his true calling instead.

Written and directed by Gary Lundgren (“Redwood Highway” and “Black Road”) the 93-minute film was shot in Ashland and Medford.

It stars Alex Frost, Michelle Lombardo, and Steve Zahn, and includes appearances by Diedrich Bader and Abraham Benrubi.

Film Series Presents “Redwood Highway” March 24

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the acclaimed 2013 independent feature “Redwood Highway” Friday, March 24 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

The film tells the story of a woman living unhappily in a retirement community who decides to walk 80 miles to the coast of Oregon. She wants to see the ocean for the first time in 45 years and attend her granddaughter’s wedding as an unexpected guest.

Written and directed by Gary Lundberg, “Redwood Highway” stars two-time Academy Award nominee Shirley Knight and Emmy winner Tom Skerritt. The 90-minute film was shot in southern Oregon and along the south coast near Brookings.

The Hoffman Center screened another Lundgren film “Black Road” last September.

A trailer for the “Redwood Highway” can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_CVEbox95g

Hoffman Center to Feature Short Films by Teens

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen a selection of films created by teens from throughout the Pacific Northwest for the “Fresh Film Northwest” program at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24. Admission will be $5 and refreshments will be available.

The dozen short films, shown as part of the Manzanita Film Series, were drawn by the Northwest Film Center of Portland from its competitions in 2014, 2015, and 2016. Entries were judged on Freshness & Originality, Persuasive Point of View, Emotional Impact, Technical Proficiency, and successful Risk-Taking.

Submissions came from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Alaska, and Vancouver, BC. Total running time will be 60 minutes.

The films to be screened are:

 “Words Of Wisdom” (Portland)

A grandmother’s advice spurs a granddaughter into action. (4 min.)

“Leo & Clark” (Portland)

Young men compare notes on the pursuit of happiness. (5 min.)

“Home” (Vancouver, BC)

Abby’s strange powers help her find a world to call home. (8 min.) Winner: Creative Expression Award

“Abduction” (Vancouver, BC)

A story of abduction and lost love. (1 min.)

“Toccata” (Vancouver, BC)

Striving for perfection, piano practice turns to obsession. (3 min.)

“Living Honestly” (Seattle)

What it’s like to come out to families and friends. (7 min.)

“Losing Alberta: Gentrification in Northeast Portland” (Portland)

How gentrification has changed a Northeast Portland community. (11 min.) Winner: Integrative Learning Award

“What I Would Say” (Portland)

True feelings are revealed in hypothetical terms. (6 min.) Winner: Heart Award

“Buster Was A Man” (Everett)

What does it take to break out of a daily routine? (5 min.) Winner: Creative Self Expression Award

“Rectangles & Straight Lines” (Portland)

A cityscape full of patterns, shapes, shadows, and movement. (3 min.)

“Solved” (Portland)

Coming up with a solution under pressure. (1 min.)

“Shakesburn” (Portland)

A stolen tri-cycle, fruitcakes, and clever insults collide. (5 min.)

Hoffman Center to Feature Short Films by Teens

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen a selection of films created by teens from throughout the Pacific Northwest for the “Fresh Film Northwest” program at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24. Admission will be $5.

The dozen short films, shown as part of the Manzanita Film Series, were drawn by the Northwest Film Center of Portland from its competitions in 2014, 2015, and 2016. Entries were judged on Freshness & Originality, Persuasive Point of View, Emotional Impact, Technical Proficiency, and successful Risk-Taking.

 

Submissions came from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Alaska, and Vancouver, BC. Total running time will be 60 minutes.

The films to be screened are:

“Words Of Wisdom” (Portland)
A grandmother’s advice spurs a granddaughter into action. (4 min.)

“Leo & Clark” (Portland)
Young men compare notes on the pursuit of happiness. (5 min.)

“Home” (Vancouver, BC)
Abby’s strange powers help her find a world to call home. (8 min.) Winner: Creative Expression Award

“Abduction” (Vancouver, BC)
A story of abduction and lost love. (1 min.)

“Toccata” (Vancouver, BC)
Striving for perfection, piano practice turns to obsession. (3 min.)

“Living Honestly” (Seattle)
What it’s like to come out to families and friends. (7 min.)

“Losing Alberta: Gentrification in Northeast Portland” (Portland)
How gentrification has changed a Northeast Portland community. (11 min.) Winner: Integrative Learning Award

“What I Would Say” (Portland)
True feelings are revealed in hypothetical terms. (6 min.) Winner: Heart Award

“Buster Was A Man” (Everett)
What does it take to break out of a daily routine? (5 min.) Winner: Creative Self Expression Award

“Rectangles & Straight Lines” (Portland)
A cityscape full of patterns, shapes, shadows, and movement. (3 min.)

“Solved” (Portland)
Coming up with a solution under pressure. (1 min.)

“Shakesburn” (Portland)
A stolen tri-cycle, fruitcakes, and clever insults collide. (5 min.)

The Manzanita Film Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Films are screened monthly throughout the year.

Short Film Festival Returns to Hoffman Center on January 27th

The Hoffman Center for the Arts Manzanita Film Series will screen “The Best of the 43rd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival” at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Jan. 27. Admission will be $5 and refreshments will be available.

The collection of eight short films was selected by the Northwest Film Center of Portland from its annual juried festival. These films were made in Oregon, Washington, Montana and British Columbia. Total running time is 72 minutes.

The films to be screened are:

“Modern Dark” by Audrey Hall, Livingston, MT.
A young man attempts to view the Universe through a childhood telescope, but is met with the challenges of his Earthly world. (6 min.)

“Canned Fit” by Woodruff Laputka, Portland.
Internationally renowned sound artist Christine Shorkhuber uses an array of “non-traditional” instruments to create minimalist melodies. (8 min.)

“Censored” by Isaiah Corey, Seattle.
A man’s life is forever changed when his roommate introduces him to a product he never knew existed or even needed. (8 min.)

“Antipodes Rising” by Georg Koszulinski, Seattle.
Traveling through a mountain tunnel in Alaska becomes a portal for an alternate vision of the Pacific Northwest. (3 min.)

“Here Nor There” by Julia Hutchings, Vancouver, BC.
Nothing is what it seems to be when an investigator arrives at a funeral to speak with the family whose body he supposedly found. (15 min.)

“Primal Flux” by Joan Gratz, Portland
Colors and shapes shift and morph as images emerge and disperse in a play on the nature of conscious and unconscious communication. (3 min.)

“Ranger” by Sandra Ignagni and Trevor Meier, Vancouver, BC.
The Canadian vessel M.V. Northern Ranger has traveled the narrow straits and unpredictable weather of the remote Labrador coastline for the last 30 years. (8 min.)

“Me is Being Great” by Marshall Granger, Missoula.
When relationships end among the confusions of growing up, one might be able to reconnect to personal identity and be set free. (21 min.)

The Manzanita Film Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Films are screened monthly throughout the year.

Film Series Presents “Seed: The Untold Story”

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the award-winning 2016 documentary “Seed: The Untold Story” Friday, Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

“Seed” follows seed keepers protecting mankind’s 12,000-year-old food legacy. As chemical companies control the majority of our seeds, farmers, scientists, lawyers, and indigenous seed keepers fight a David and Goliath battle to defend the future of our food. In a harrowing and heartening story, these reluctant heroes rekindle a lost connection to our most treasured resource and revive a culture connected to seeds.

Directed by Jon Betz and Taggart Siegel, the 94-minute film stars Vandana Shiva, Andrew Kimbrell, Jane Goodall, Winona LaDuke and Raj Patel.

Get ready for A Dark and Stormy Night – Mystery Weekend in Manzanita

4f7a9b905a1bc2d6c97e5c8f0157ee9d_fullIt’s going to be another dark and stormy weekend in Manzanita, November 18 – 20, a Mystery Weekend which promises even more twists and turns than last year’s inaugural event.
Sponsored by the Hoffman Center for the Arts, North Tillamook Library, Riverbend Players, NCRD Center for Performing Arts and CART’M, mystery enthusiasts can partake in a variety of activities over the three-days. According to event coordinator Madeline Olson, there’s something for everyone.
“What started as a mystery book sale at the North Tillamook Library in Manzanita two years ago expanded the following year to include more mystery-related events along with additional collaborators interested in establishing a fall shoulder-season event,” Olson explained. “This year promises even more fun with more activities.”

Mystery Weekend II kicks off Friday, Nov. 18 with two evening events. The Riverbend Players present “Dead Give Away” at 7 p.m. at the NCRD Center for Performing Arts in nearby Nehalem. Admission is $15. At 7:30 in Manzanita the Hoffman Center for the Arts is host to a mystery movie presentation of “If There’s A Hell Below” at 7:30 p.m. at a cost of $5 at the door.
On Saturday, Nov. 19, mystery activities include a mystery version of Story Time for Children featuring “Where’s My Teddy,” by Jez Alborough, at 11 a.m. at the North Tillamook Library, 571 Laneda Ave. in Manzanita. The first 10 families attending the event will receive a free book.

“Taking Your Mystery Recycling” is the theme of an all-day free event at CART’M from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., while NCRD, by popular demand, is host to a Live Clue Experience, a family-oriented whodunnit with prizes and snacks from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Hoffman Center events on Saturday include a Writing Scary workshop by author Cat Winters from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Pre-register on the Hoffman blog. Cost is $30. Winters will read from her new novel “Yesternight” at 7 p.m. at the Hoffman Center, which will be followed by the Writer’s Series Open Mic with the theme “It Was A Dark & Stormy Night” for those wishing to share their creations. Admission is $7 at the door.

Mystery Weekend wraps up on Sunday, the 20th, with the Mystery Book Sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the North Tillamook Library featuring gently used mystery books with proceeds helping to support library building maintenance. And, if you missed the Riverbend Players presentation of “Dead Give Away,” at the NCRD Center for Performing Arts, you have another opportunity at 2 p.m.