Word & Image Event Showcases

Word & Image Event Showcases
Saturday, August 26 | 7 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts

 

Word & Image is a summer exhibit at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita, which pairs artists and writers to create original work, each in
response to the other’s.

Join us at 7pm Saturday, August 26 at the Hoffman Center for the Arts to view the results of this unique creative experience, one that co-organizers Emily Ransdell and Andy Barker call “silent collaboration.” Twelve artists and twelve writers drew names, and have created art and writing in response to each other’s creative work.

At the event, you’ll view original art, listen to original readings responding to art and have a chance to purchase broadsides of the collaborations along with a keepsake book of all the creative results. Suggested donation for the event is $5.

For those who cannot attend the launch evening, Hoffman Center for the Arts Gallery will be open every Friday and Saturday, from 3 to 5pm, to view the broadsides. The gallery show will run through the end of September.

“We piloted this project two summers ago,” Ransdell explains.  “Writing in response to art has been popular for centuries — we thought it would be fun for artists to have their turn as well, creating art in response to writing.”

“It turned out to be a great experience for the participants,” Ransdell adds, “Unlike a more typical themed show, the concept of response art and writing enabled each participant to both showcase their own personal style and to connect with others through interpreting each other’s work. People explored new mediums and methods with wonderful results.”

Participants were selected via a blind submission process, with judging by a group of past Word & Image participants as well as participants in Manzanita Writers’ weekly Writers’ Lounge. Judges for writing included Bob Balmer, Kathryn Stock and Phyllis Mannan. Judges for art included Karen Gale, Cathi Howell and Scott Wilson.

“By limiting participants to 12 writers and artists, we make sure we give all the participants the space and time for their work to be represented well,” Ransdell said. “And we want the community participation to be as broad and diverse as possible.  There is so much talent in our area.”

The Hoffman’s Word and Image project is open to all artists and writers who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area.

Ransdell is a poet with an MFA in Creative Writing.  She is a 2016 Pushcart Prize Nominee and was a finalist for the 2016 Rattle Poetry Prize.  She serves as co-chair of the Manzanita PoetryFest and divides her time between Manzanita and Camas, Wa.

Barker taught creative writing as a high school English teacher for over 30 years before retiring two years ago. His stories have appeared in journals including the Oregon publications Rain Magazine and The North Coast Squid. He also serves as team leader for The North Coast Squid.

Word & Image is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue.) For more information contact Emily Ransdell at emilyransdell@yahoo.com

Word & Image Open for Submissions March 1 through April 7

Deadline has been extended to April 7, 2017.

Entries will be accepted March 1 through April 7, 2017 for the third annual Word & Image project, a summer exhibit at the Hoffman Center for the Arts pairing artists and writers to create original work, each in response to the other’s.

Here’s how it works:  12 selected artists and writers will be randomly paired at a Hoffman Center gathering on June 2.  Each will be given printed copies of the other’s submitted work.  Then each writer and each artist will create new work in response to one of the three pieces submitted by their partner.  A writer might create a new poem in response to a watercolor, for example.  A photographer might make a new image in response to a prose piece.

The artwork will be exhibited at a Hoffman Center event on August 26, where the writers will also read their new work.  The paired work will be printed on broadsides which will hang in the HCA gallery as well as published in a book.  Both will be available for sale.

The Hoffman Center’s Word & Image project is open to artists and writers who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area. In order to provide opportunities for new contributors, those who participated in both the 2015 and 2016 projects are not eligible to submit to this year’s project.

Here’s one of our favorites:  Debra Simmons submitted her poem “Good Intentions” and Karen Gale painted “Sunday Dinner” in response.

Key Dates:

March 1 – April 7: Initial submissions due from writers and artists

May 1: Participants announced

June 2: Selected artists and writers paired at a kick-off gathering

July 15: New (response) work for the Word & Image exhibit due from each artist and writer

August 26:  Opening reception and reading at the Hoffman Center for the Arts

Participants will be selected by a judging team of past participants.

 

For complete guidelines click here.

Word & Image 2016 Event on August 20th

simmonsgale artist response

An example from the 2015 Word & Image Project

Twelve writers and twelve artists have been hard at work this summer responding to each other’s work.  Their combined pieces will be unveiled at an art opening and reading on Saturday, August 20th, starting at 7 pm.  The 11 by 17 broadsides are made up of an image of the artist’s work along with the writer’s piece printed side by side on archival paper, suitable for framing.  They will be for sale, along with smaller versions of each duo.

New this year, a book featuring the entire collection will be for sale as well.

Along with the broadsides, the original art pieces will be on display affording viewers insight into a variety of techniques.

Writers will read their poems and short prose pieces at the event.

There is a suggested donation of $5 and all proceeds from the event and art sales benefit the Hoffman Center for the Arts.

This project is supported in part by a grant from The Oregon Cultural Trust:  Oregonians sustaining, developing, and participating in our arts, heritage and humanities.

Word & Image Opens for Submissions on April 1st

word image logo

Submissions are open April 1 through May 1, 2016 for Word & Image, a summer exhibit at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita which will pair artists and writers to create original work, each in response to the other’s. Click here to submit your work.

Word & Image will offer up to 12 selected artists and writers a unique creative experience, one that co-organizers Deborah DeWit and Emily Ransdell call “silent collaboration.”

“We piloted this project last summer,” Ransdell explained.  “Writing in response to art has been popular for centuries — we thought it would be fun for artists to have their turn as well, creating art in response to writing.”

Co-organizer DeWit added,  “It turned out to be a great experience for the participants. Unlike a more typical themed show, the concept of response art and writing enabled each participant to both showcase their own personal style and to connect with others through interpreting each other’s work. People explored new mediums and methods with wonderful results.”

Ransdell said that the project began as a spin-off of the Hoffman’s weekly Writer’s Lounge, where writers are invited to create short pieces in response to various prompts, often resulting in work that surprises the authors themselves.  Last summer’s call for submissions to Word and Image was so successful that Ransdell and DeWit will be jurying the entries this year via a blind submission process.

“By limiting participants to 12 writers and artists, we can make sure we give all the participants the space and time for their work to be represented well,” DeWit said. “And we want the community participation to be as broad and diverse as possible.  There is so much talent in our area.”

Here’s a sample of one of last year’s favorites:  Debra Simmons submitted her poem “Good Intentions” and Karen Gale painted “Sunday Dinner” in response.

simmonsgale artist response

The Hoffman Center’s Word and Image project is open to all artists and writers who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area. Submissions will be accepted from April 1 through May 1, 2016.  Selected artists and writers will be paired at a kick-off gathering on June 4, with the resulting new work for the Word and Image exhibit due from each artist and writer by July 25.  An opening reception and reading will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on August 20.   Review detailed submission guidelines here.

Participants will be selected by a Hoffman Center team, led by Ransdell and DeWit. Ransdell is a poet with an MFA in Creative Writing.  A past recipient of an American Academy of Poets Prize, she is currently a member of The Poet’s Studio at The Attic Institute in Portland.  She divides her time between Manzanita and Camas, Wa.

DeWit, a full-time painter and photographer for 35 years, has exhibited widely. Her work is included in many private and public collections throughout the Pacific Northwest.  She is also a published author, with three books in publication and is the subject of a documentary, “Wetlands: Seasons of Mind” about her painting and its relationship with the natural world.  Currently she exhibits with Whitebird Gallery in Cannon Beach and Rowboat Gallery in Pacific City. She lives with her husband, filmmaker Carl Vandervoort, in Wheeler.

This project is supported in part by a grant from The Oregon Cultural Trust: Oregonians sustaining, developing and participating in our arts, heritage and humanities.

 

Can Artists and Writers See Through Each Other’s Eyes?

birdsFifteen artists and writers are immersed in a unique creative experience this summer at the coast, trying to see through each other’s eyes in their own creative process.

They are taking part in a new program at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita.

Titled “Word & Image: A Dialog Between Writers and Artists,” the program paired artists and writers to create original pieces, each in response to the other’s work.

The Hoffman Center for the Arts is known for its variety of programming for all of the creative arts, with the Writers’ Series, Clay Studio, art workshops and shows, Friday Night Flicks, and musical events.

This summer, two women launched a program to combine two of those arts, spurring artists and writers to leave their comfort zones for this different kind of creative process.

Emily Ransdell is a poet with an MFA in Creative Writing. A past recipient of an Academy of American Poets Prize, she is currently a member of The Poet’s Studio at The Attic Institute in Portland. Deborah DeWit, a full-time painter and photographer for 35 years, has exhibited widely. Her work is included in many private and public collections throughout the Pacific Northwest.

“Writers have been writing in response to art for centuries,” said Ransdell. “We thought it would be interesting to try a modern take on the tradition by letting artists have their turn as well.”

Ransdell described the project as a spin-off of the Hoffman’s weekly Writing Lounge, where local writers create short pieces in response to various prompts, often resulting in works that surprise the authors themselves.
Whereas artists and writers usually generate works that reflect their own experience and vision of the world, this project compels them to respond to someone else’s vision of the world.

“This way of finding subject matter for an art piece is both similar and different than the way I usually work,” says artist Lori Dillon, “a lot of the time I do get inspired by an event, series of events, or my own poetry/writing in my head.  So the difference is that I’m being ‘led to create’ by someone else’s voice.”

“One key thing here,” adds Ransdell, “There are no rules. No set process. The artist and writer can choose to meet or not, discuss or not, share results ahead or not. The whole goal of this was for people to experiment.”

Everyone seems to be approaching it differently. Some have looked at other works by the artist and writer. Some met once to discuss, others not at all. Some pairs are exchanging process progress and results all along the way.

Artist Vera Wildauer and poet Phyllis Mannan were matched and chose not to meet or discuss their process.
“It might be good to see the original,” Mannan wrote Wildauer in an email, “but I don’t think I want to hear the background, at least not right away. I want to let my unconscious mind work a bit first.”

“I rarely work from a picture or photograph when I write,” Mannan added in an interview, “so this way of working was unfamiliar to me. I learned to closely study the nuances of a scene, to question the relationship between people and objects. I hope to use the process of careful questioning in future work.”

“I was immediately drawn to one of Phyllis’ three poems,” Wildauer describes working from the other direction, “since it included so many images and evoked so much meaning about the ‘real world’ versus faith — with some odd juxtapositions. I had a great time with it, finding mixed media to lend itself to the process perhaps more than other forms.”
Writer Aina Tonjes and artist Cathi Howell did choose to meet.

“I got two pieces to choose from,” says Tonjes, “and after meeting with Cathi in person one of them became much more relevant than the other. I did need to know what exactly moved her to put those shapes down, and without having talked about it I don’t think I would have been able to motivate myself to write.”

“I wasn’t sure how to best write about Deborah’s piece at first,” Ransdell said. The two coordinators are taking on the same challenge as all the participants. “I didn’t want to just describe. I wanted to evoke something.”
She remembered a technique that poet and teacher Andrea Hollander used during a PoetryFest workshop in Manzanita. Hollander had the participants choose six words and work from there.

“So I chose six words that Deborah’s piece made me think of and I’m working from those,” Ransdell adds, “It’s definitely a technique I’ll use again. I was surprised and pleased; it’s a different kind of poem for me.”

The thirty participants range in age from 15 to mid-80’s, and come from as far away as Long Beach Peninsula and Portland to those who live full or part time in Manzanita, Nehalem and Wheeler. At the evening event where participants were paired up,

Juleen Johnson attended via Facetime. Her husband held up an iPad so Juleen could see the audience and the event from her location attending the Iowa Writers Conference in Iowa City, Iowa.

The event has certainly paired up people who might never have interacted otherwise. 15-year-old writer Elizabeth Johnson brought her parents along from Long Beach, Washington, to meet with photographer Steve Jones, 61.

Artist Karen Gale said “the biggest surprise was to find how much my partner Deb Simmons and I had in common both in our styles and in our lives. We are the perfect partnership!”

Simmons responded in an email to the same interview question whether anything surprised her about the process with “the friendship that has formed with MY artist!”

“I think all of us feel like the bar is kind of high,” says Dewit, “I need to do something worthy. Plus it’s just one piece of art or writing, not one of many of your works in one place. And everyone feels a commitment to each other, to honor their work.”

“What a challenge this has been, what a stretch,” adds Simmons, “The bottom line is to come up with something ‘worthy’ of the artwork, which I admire and love.”

The results will be unveiled at an opening reception and reading at the Hoffman Center for the Arts on Saturday, August 29, open to the public. Each pairing will be printed as a frame-able art piece and offered for sale as a souvenir for people who come to the show.

The project might well become a recurring event. After all, it exemplifies the Hoffman Center for the Arts’ tagline and goal: Explore. Create. Connect.

And who knows, it might inspire other projects.  “This is such a unique event!” says Lori Dillon, “Now I’m thinking about the concept of pairing musicians and writers and visual artists.  Whoa, doesn’t that sound crazy and good?

If Vincent Van Gogh and Maya Angelou Lived Here

word image logoIt seems that the new Word & Image project has been a little confusing, so here’s an example that might help clarify the concept.

 

 

  • Van Gogh submits three paintings he has lying around the house by May 11th deadline:  “Irises”, “Crows over a Wheat Field”, and “The Bedroom.”
  • Maya Angelou submits three poems by May 11th:  “Caged Bird”, “Women Work”, and ”
    Still I Rise.”
  • At the June 13th event, the two of them get randomly paired.
  • Van Gogh chooses one of Maya’s poems to “respond” to with a painting.  Let’s say he chooses “Caged Bird.”
  • Maya chooses “The Bedroom” to write a poem in response.
  • Van Gogh turns in his painting inspired by “Caged Bird” and Maya turns in her poem “The Bedroom” by August 3rd.
  • Then we have a show on August 29th where all four of their works are shown.  Maya’s “Caged Bird” Poem next to Van Gogh’s “Caged Bird” Painting.  Van Gogh’s “The Bedroom” painting next to Maya’s “The Bedroom” poem.  Plus, each of those pairs are printed as a frame-able art piece and offered for sale as a souvenir for people who come to the show.
And by the way, 3-D art is encouraged as well.
If you still have questions send a note to hoffmanwordandimage@gmail.com and either Emily Ransdell or Deborah DeWit will contact you.
For more detailed submission guidelines, click here.

Call for Submissions for Word and Image Project

word image logoSubmissions are now open for an innovative summer exhibit at the Hoffman Center in Manzanita. The exhibit will pair artists and writers to create original work, each in response to the other’s.

The “Word and Image” project will offer up to 15 selected artists and writers a unique creative experience, one that co-organizers Deborah DeWit and Emily Ransdell call “silent collaboration.”

“Writers have been writing in response to art for centuries,” said Ransdell. “We thought it would be interesting to create a modern take on the tradition by letting artists have their turn as well.”

Ransdell said that the project is a spin-off of the Hoffman Center’s weekly Writing Lounge, where local writers create short pieces in response to various prompts, often resulting in works that surprise the authors themselves.

“All creative output is in response to something — an idea, an emotion, or an image,” added DeWit. “This is not a ‘theme’ project, in which everyone is asked to interpret the same subject, but rather a way for each artist and writer to utilize their own personal point of view and style to interpret another’s creation.”

Word and Image is open to all artists and writers who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area. Interested writers and artists should submit three samples of their work via e-mail to hoffmanwordandimage@gmail.com.

The deadline for submissions is May 11, 2015. Selected artists and writers will be notified by Jun. 1 and paired off at a kick-off gathering on June 13. New work for the Word and Image exhibit will be due from each artist and writer by August 3rd, with an opening reception and reading to be held at the Hoffman Center on Saturday, August 29.

Click here for instructions for submitting words or images or by sending a message to hoffmanwordandimage@gmail.com.

A Hoffman Center team, led by Ransdell and DeWit, will select participants. Ransdell is a poet with an MFA in Creative Writing. A past recipient of an American Academy of Poets Prize, she is currently a member of The Poet’s Studio at The Attic Institute in Portland. DeWit, a full-time painter and photographer for 35 years, has exhibited widely. Her work is included in many private and public collections throughout the Pacific Northwest.