Publishing Your Chapbook

The Manzanita Writers’ Series presents a workshop “Publishing Your Chapbook: for poetry chapbooks, books of short stories/essays” on April 15, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m

We are currently enjoying a small press renaissance, with countless publishing options for emerging authors. From submitting to reputable chapbook publishers to creating handmade, locally printed, limited editions of your work, the world has never been more open to an author’s specific vision.

Join award-winning poet and literary agent John Sibley Williams for this hands-on workshop exploring the ins-and-outs of organizing and publishing your chapbook. For writers of both poetry and prose, “Publishing your Chapbook” will guide you all the way from inspiration to publication.

John Sibley Williams serves as editor of The Inflectionist Review and works as both a literary agent and Marketing Director of Portland-based Inkwater Press. He is the editor of two Northwest literary anthologies and the author of nine poetry collections, including Disinheritance and Controlled Hallucinations. A five-time Pushcart nominee and winner of the Philip Booth Award, American Literary Review Poetry Contest, Nancy D. Hargrove Editors’ Prize, Confrontation Poetry Prize, and Vallum Award for Poetry, John has an MA in Creative Writing from Rivier College and an MA in Book Publishing from Portland State University.

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40

Register online by using the Add to Cart button below.

Mary C. Myers, Med, BCC, to Speak

Art of Aging/of Dying series
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 from 3 to 5pm.

Legacy writing is the invitation and the opportunity to reflect on your stories and the meaning they convey, to write from your heart about what truly matters in your life. These are the treasures you pass on to future generations, your beliefs, wisdom and blessings.

An ethical will is a document written to communicate values and wisdom, history, stories, and love from one generation to another. It preserves who you are and what matters most to you. It’s a way for you to be remembered.

“I am passionate about legacy writing and creating ethical wills because I have seen the gift it is to writers as well as their loved ones, whether shared in the midst of life or at the end. We are story telling/story catcher people who make sense of our lives and our place in the world through story and through story we are able to share our deeper selves, our souls.”

— Mary C. Myers

Mary C. Myers served over forty years in ministry, including twenty-three years as a Board Certified Chaplain in acute care, hospice and outreach to the marginalized. Personal story has been the constant at the heart of her ministry. She is a Certified Legacy Writing Facilitator.

Join us to explore legacy writing and learn more about creating your own legacy letters and ethical will. Admission for the Hoffman Center is $5.

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue.) Further information is available at hoffmanblog.org <http://hoffmanblog.org> online or contact Tela Skinner, telaskinner@gmail.com

Workshop: Writing the Food Memoir on October 21

The Manzanita Writers’ Series presents a writing workshop at the Hoffman Center for the Arts.  Sweet and Salty: Writing the Food Memoir led by Diana Abu-Jaber will be held on Saturday, October 21st, from 10 am to 12:30 pm.

Tell me what you eat, said Brillat-Savarin, and I shall tell you what you are. Lives are filled with stories and plots but none is juicier than the one told with food. Culinary memoirs are wildly popular, taking readers beyond memory into the senses—especially the deep pleasures of the appetite.  Food sharpens the focus, introduces universal themes, and endows writing with imaginative, emotional, and physical layers of complexity.

This workshop will look at ways to write life stories by peering through the culinary lens.

There will be writing prompts, exercises, discussions, and food. We’ll be tasting and thinking and comparing notes, considering all the ways that our connections to eating gives rise to remembering and inspiration. Come and see what you cook up. Bring your curiosity and your appetite, a sense of play and a sense of humor.

Tuition is $40. Register using the Add to Cart button below.

Author Laurie Frankel to Read From Her New Novel

Laurie Frankel will read from her third novel This is How It Always Is
Saturday, March 18, 2017 ~ 7 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts,Manzanita
 

This is How It Always Is involves a family of five boys, the youngest of whom becomes a girl. Frankel has drawn on her own experiences as a parent with a transgender daughter, to write a novel for anyone who has to toss out the best laid plans in the face of the unexpected, and for anyone who finds changes both terrifying and miraculous.

 “Well-plotted, well-researched, and unflaggingly interesting…As thought-provoking a domestic novel as we have seen this year.”―Kirkus

 “Frankel’s slightly askew voice…keeps the narrative sharp and surprising. This is a wonderfully contradictory story—heartwarming and generous, yet written with a wry sensibility.”
―Publisher’s Weekly

 “It’s early days, but this big-hearted novel about a family with a transgender child is in the lead for the most sensitively and sincerely told story of 2017… Frankel’s portrayal of even the most openhearted parents’ doubts and fears around a child’s gender identity elevates this novel. -People (Book of the Week)

 Frankel is the author of two previous novels, The Atlas of Love and Goodbye for Now. She lives in Seattle with her daughter and husband.

Frankel will offer a workshop during the day on “Project Journaling” from 1 to 3:30 pm.

Journaling about your writing project increases your productivity and publishing success. It works no matter what you’re writing (novel, memoir, short stories, nonfiction, poetry, blog posts). Most published authors use some version of this tool.

The idea is that in addition to writing whatever you’re writing, you also write about it — your goals/milestones, your thoughts about directions to go next, realizations about what you need to go back and fix, research done and how it might be incorporated, research that still needs doing, problem-solving, to-do lists. Learn how to make the most of this tool.

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40. Register using the Add to Cart button below.

 
Following Frankel’s reading and Q&A in the evening, we’ll have our popular Open Mic where up to nine local or visiting writers will read 5 minutes of their original work. The suggested (not required) theme for the evening’s Open Mic is “Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes.” Admission for the evening reading is $7.

The Manzanita Writers’ Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and will
be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue)
For further information contact Kathie Hightower, kathiejhightower@gmail.com

PoetryFest 2017

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!
PoetryFest 2017
Friday, March 31 through Sunday April 2
with Carl Adamshick and Emily Kendal Frey

Sign up online using the Add To Cart button at the bottom of this page.

Last year’s PoetryFest 2016 was the first 3-day event sponsored by Manzanita Writers’ Series and the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita.

“All 24 registration spots filled before we could even get a press release out,” says Phyllis Mannan, one of the event coordinators. This year registration will open February 15 after press releases go out.

Three days of poetry workshops, writing, reading, networking…all immersed in the inspiration and creativity that a long beach weekend provides. What’s not to like?

Event organizers were pleased to see so many writers from Portland, as well as up and down the coast join local participants for the weekend in 2016, and hope to see a good mix again this year.

The participants all said they would return to PoetryFest in future and recommend it to others. “I feel very renewed and inspired,” said Jennifer Dorner.

The topics for 2017 are Moods and Modes.

The workshops will focus on understanding poems as modes of expression. Classes will include discussion not of poems of formalized structure like sonnets, haiku, villanelle or pantoums, but rather of poems with a mode and governing purpose like elegies, odes, aubades (love poems about dawn), blazons (poems in which the speaker describes his lover’s body) and epithalamiums (wedding poems).  Participants will then pick, choose and invent their own modes of expression and ascribe different tones and feelings to each mode.

The workshops will begin with lecture/discussion and will include ample opportunity for generative writing.

Carl Adamshick is the author of Curses and Wishes, which won the Walt Whitman award from the Academy of American Poets and Saint Friend, published with McSweeney’s. Both titles received an Oregon Book Award. He has taught at Catlin Gabel and lectured at Stanford University and the American International School in Vienna, as well as being a writer in-residence at the William Stafford Archive at Lewis and Clark College. His work has been published in Harvard Review, American Poetry Review, The Missouri Review and Narrative. He is a founder and editor at Tavern Books, a non-profit press dedicated to poetry and the preservation of books.

“This tone of voice, Carl Adamshick’s, is a new one, a voice
that cannot be faked and bears the marks of having been earned.”
— Marvin Bell, judge for the Walt Whitman Award

Emily Kendal Frey is the author of several poetry collections, including The Grief Performance, winner of the 2012 Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and Sorrow Arrow, winner of the 2015 Oregon Book Award. She teaches at the Independent Publishing Resource Center, Marylhurst University, Portland Community College and Portland State University.

Wily, witty and weird, often haunting, sometimes heartbreaking,
[Frey’s] poems…dive deep, for all their individual brevity.
—Dana Levin, judge of 2012 Norma Farber First Book Award

Fee for the weekend of workshops and an introductory networking evening on Friday is $165 through March 15 and $195 after. Register online using the button below.

 

Writers’ Series Features Arthur Bradford on February 18, 2017

Arthur Bradford will read from his short story collection, Turtle Face and Beyond, at 7pm at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on Saturday, February 18, 2017.

Arthur Bradford is an O Henry Award winning writer and Emmy-nominated filmmaker. His writing has appeared in Esquire, McSweeney’s, Vice, Men’s Journal, and many other publications. His first book, Dogwalker, has been translated into ten languages.  He’s published two children’s books, Benny’s Brigade and 43 Monsters, along with the current collection of short stories, Turtle Face and Beyond.

“Beautifully bent, generous, and funny…” — Vanity Fair

“Arthur Bradford’s work is uncategorizable and unprecedented, but if pressed, you could call it the improbable spawn of Raymond Carver and Roald Dahl. His stories are hilarious and strange…” — Dave Eggers

“One of the funniest, smartest, tallest writers at work in America today.”             — Zadie Smith

“The most outlandish and energetic writer I can think of.”  — David Sedaris

Bradford is also creator and director of the acclaimed “How’s Your News?” documentary series, versions of which have been broadcast on HBO/Cinemax, PBS, and Channel Four England.

Bradford brought his writer’s sensibility to a recent film project in which he documented the creation of the TV show South Park for Comedy Central.  The film, “Six Days to Air” was nominated for an Emmy Award, in part because of the unprecedented intimate access to the writer’s room of the show.

Bradford will offer a workshop during the day on “What Can Writers Learn From South Park?” from 1 to 3:30 pm.

At first glance this crude animated show might appear to offer few lessons for the serious fiction writer, but Bradford discovered that the unconventional way this show is produced offers valuable lessons for anyone engaged in creative pursuit, especially writers.

In this workshop Bradford will show clips from his film and discuss which lessons apply to writers in general.  Participants should come prepared to write.  This is a fiction/non-fiction writing workshop.

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40. Register for the class here.

Following Bradford’s reading and Q&A in the evening, we’ll have our popular Open Mic where up to nine local or visiting writers will read 5 minutes of their original work. The suggested (not required) theme for the evening’s Open Mic is “A Good Idea That Turned Bad.” Admission for the evening reading is $7.

 

Ingrid Thoft to Lead Writing Workshop on November 18, 2017

The Manzanita Writers’ Series presents a workshop “Mastering Murder” on November 18, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 pm.

No, this isn’t a workshop to teach you how to be an assassin.  But, it can help you write from the point of view of one.

Want to demystify the process of writing a mystery?  We’ll examine the guts of the modern mystery and help you make progress on your idea or manuscript.  How do you craft a suspenseful plot?  Create memorable characters?  Make it realistic?  And knock your readers dead?  Join Ingrid Thoft and find out!

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40. Register using the button below.

Thoft will read from her book Duplicity that evening as featured author of the Manzanita Writers’ Series, followed by Open Mic.

Pauls Toutonghi to Lead Workshop on September 16, 2017

The Manzanita Writers’ Series will present a workshop “Writing with Balance” led by Pauls Toutonghi on September 18, 2017 from 1 to 3:30 p.m.

Often, the most personal stories are the most painful. When Pauls set out to tell the story of a lost dog — in his book, Dog Gone (Knopf, 2016), he actually realized that he was unraveling a complicated story of family love, loss, and abuse. This was a challenge, since he still had to negotiate active relationships with many of the people who were in the book.

How can we decide what to tell — and what not to tell? What are some of the best practices for determining the best way to use a difficult or personally challenging piece of your story? We will look at examples of fiction — and non-fiction — considering what the effect of personal trauma is on a storyteller, and a story.

Pauls will draw on examples from both my fiction, and non-fiction, as well as stories from other writers.

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40. Register using the button below.

Toutonghi will read from his book, Dog Gone, that evening at 7 pm as featured author of the Manzanita Writers’ Series, followed by Open Mic.

Writing Workshop to be Held on May 20, 2017: Research and Writing-A Balance

The Manzanita Writers’ Series presents a workshop “Research and Writing: A Balance” on Saturday, May 20, 2017 from 1 to 3 p.m.

Join writer Jonathan White for a discussion of how to manage research while writing.  This is not for technical or academic writing, but writing for a general audience. The writing informs the research, but the research also informs the writing.  How do you balance the two?  How much research is too much?  Too little?

Discussion topics include how to conduct interviews, travel, note-taking, recordings, the role of patience and luck, and how to organize and manage research materials while writing.  Much of this will be a nuts-and-bolts conversation, but we will also consider the meta issue of internalizing what we learn through research — balancing what we find “out there” and what we must find “in here.”

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40. Register using the button below.

White will also read from his book Tides:  The Science and Spirit of the Ocean that evening at 7 p.m. as featured author of the Manzanita Writers’ Series, followed by Open Mic.

Workshop to be Held on April 15, 2017: Publishing Your Chapbook

The Manzanita Writers’ Series presents a workshop “Publishing Your Chapbook: for poetry chapbooks, books of short stories/essays” on April 15, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

We are currently enjoying a small press renaissance, with countless publishing options for emerging authors. From submitting to reputable chapbook publishers to creating handmade, locally printed, limited editions of your work, the world has never been more open to an author’s specific vision.

Join award-winning poet and literary agent John Sibley Williams for this hands-on workshop exploring the ins-and-outs of organizing and publishing your chapbook. For writers of both poetry and prose, “Publishing your Chapbook” will guide you all the way from inspiration to publication.

John Sibley Williams serves as editor of The Inflectionist Review and works as both a literary agent and Marketing Director of Portland-based Inkwater Press. He is the editor of two Northwest literary anthologies and the author of nine poetry collections, including Disinheritance and Controlled Hallucinations. A five-time Pushcart nominee and winner of the Philip Booth Award, American Literary Review Poetry Contest, Nancy D. Hargrove Editors’ Prize, Confrontation Poetry Prize, and Vallum Award for Poetry, John has an MA in Creative Writing from Rivier College and an MA in Book Publishing from Portland State University.

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40.  Register using the button below.