Writers’ Series Features Liz Prato Reading from Baby’s On Fire CANCELLED

liz prato

EVENT AND WORKSHOP CANCELLED DUE TO STORM EXPECTED ON SATURDAY.

Liz Prato will read from her short story collection, Baby’s On Fire, at 7pm at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on Saturday, October 15, 2016.

“The stories are at once beautifully written and tremendously compelling—not to mention filled with characters so full of life that they feel as real as people we know. A knockout collection.”

—Molly Antopol, The UnAmericans

“Liz Prato’s characters blaze with humanity, sensuality, and hope. Her writing glitters and her stories push us to the edge: Prato rubs her people together until they spark, in a book that throbs with heart—and grips our own.”—Dylan Landis, author of Rainey Royal

Liz’s short stories and essays have appeared in over two-dozen literary journals and magazines. She was the Guest Prose Editor for the Summer 2013 issue of VoiceCatcher, and edited the fiction anthology, The Night, and the Rain, and the River.

Awards include the 2010 Minnetonka Review Editor’s Prize, 1st place in the 2005 Berkeley Fiction Review Sudden Fiction Contest, four Pushcart Prize nominations, and a Scholarship to the 2012 Sewanee Writers’ Conference. She began teaching at the Attic Institute in in 2008, and has taught creative writing for several literary organizations throughout Oregon.

Prato will lead a writing workshop during the day from 1 to 3 pm:

Writing Outside the Box (Lecture, & Guided Writing)

Let your creativity have free rein and write outside traditional prose structure! All stories and essays are different, so it stands to reason they don’t all require the same structure. In this class, we’ll break out of the standard narrative box and have fun exploring the forms available for telling your best story.

Tuition is $30. Register online here.

Following Prato’s reading and Q&A in the evening, we’ll have our popular Open Mic where up to nine local or visiting writers will read 5 minutes of their original work. The suggested (not required) theme for the evening’s Open Mic is “Characters.” Admission for the evening reading is $7.

 

Cascadia Book Event on September 10th

Cascadia Cover 6072The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will host a book reading by H. W. “Buzz” Bernard, author of “Cascadia” Saturday, Sep. 10 at 7 p.m.

“Cascadia,” Bernard’s fifth novel, tells the story of a major earthquake and tsunami striking Manzanita on a busy summer day. It intermixes the lives of a famed geologist who foresees the disaster and tries to get the public to pay attention, with his retired clergyman/counselor friend, who supports him despite widespread skepticism.

Other characters include a former fighter pilot trying to make amends with a local woman he jilted years before, and an eccentric retiree who searches the area for legendary buried treasure.

“Cascadia” has been cited for its graphic depiction of the devastation that could occur when “The Big One” – the dreaded Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake – occurs just off the Oregon coast.

Jerry Thompson, author of the non-fiction work “Cascadia’s Fault: The Coming Earthquake and Tsunami that Could Devastate North America,” said Bernard’s book is “riveting, scary, and entirely believable . . . a compelling, page-turning thriller with the ring of truth.”

Bernard is a native Oregonian. Before becoming a novelist, he worked at The Weather Channel, as a senior meteorologist for 13 years. Prior to that, he was a weather officer in the U.S. Air Force for over three decades. His airborne experiences included a mission with Air Force Hurricane Hunters, airdrops over the Arctic Ocean and Turkey, and a stint as a weather officer aboard a Tactical Air Command airborne command post.

Copies of “Cascadia” will be available for sale and autographing at the reading.

Representatives of the Emergency Volunteer Corps of Nehalem Bay will also be on hand to demonstrate and sell disaster supplies.

Mindy Halleck to teach a writing workshop on “How Objects Tell a Story” September 17th: CANCELLED

halleck

This class has been CANCELLED.

Author Mindy Halleck will teach a writing workshop on “How Objects Tell a Story” on Saturday, September 17th, 2016 from 10 to 3 at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita.

This workshop is useful for writers working in Novel, Short Story or Memoir.

What is lord of the Rings without the RING, Cinderella without GLASS SLIPPERS? These iconic objects are shorthand for legendary stories that could not be told without them. Objects, sometimes called plot-devices, in fiction writing can be over done. However a well-crafted plot device, or one that emerges naturally from the setting or characters of the story, can enrich the story and provide an added layer of reader satisfaction. Students will learn to create a narrative for an object that can be backstory shorthand, enhance storytelling, help eliminate pages of narration and aid in telling a more layered tale. We’ll look at the when, where, and how objects intersect with plot, and how to create more depth in stories. There will be writing exercises, visual presentations, displays, Q & A, handouts, and powerful story discovery worksheets.

Mindy will do a reading from her novel, Return to Sender at the Cloud & Leaf Bookstore after class from 4:30-5:30 PM.

Mindy Halleck is an award-winning author, and instructor. Her novel Return to Sender – set in the Manzanita Oregon of the 1950s – was a featured debut novel in Kirkus Review Magazine in 2015, and also won a ‘Readers Favorite’ award. Recently, Halleck won a Writer’s Digest fiction contest with her short story, A Mother’s Confession, which is published in the Nov/Dec 2016 Writer’s Digest Magazine. Halleck blogs at Literary Liaisons and is an active member of the writing community. A one-time magazine columnist and travel writer, she is a happily married, globe-trotter currently working on her second novel, Garden of Lies.

Register here by September 10th for this fast paced informative writer’s workshop.  There is a minimum of 8 students for the workshop to happen.  The workshop cost is $50.

Writers’ Series Presents Special Event: Author Megan Kruse and Hawthorne Books Publisher Rhonda Hughes

Megan Kruse (left) and Rhonda Hughes celebrate publication of Call Me Home

Megan Kruse (left) and Rhonda Hughes celebrate publication of Call Me Home

The Manzanita Writers’ Series sponsors a special event : “Inside the Publisher/Author Relationship,” with an author reading and conversation between  Megan Kruse and Hawthorne Books publisher Rhonda Hughes , at 7pm at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on Saturday, July 16, 2016. Kruse will also conduct a writing workshop during the day.

Call Me Home is Kruse’s debut novel, released from Hawthorne Books in March 2015, with an introduction by Elizabeth Gilbert. The book won the 2015 Rainbow Award for Gay Contemporary Fiction.

Kruse will read from her novel. Then she and Hughes will talk about how to get published and the editing process that follows, an inside view into the publisher/author relationship.

Kruse grew up in the Pacific Northwest and currently lives in Olympia. She studied creative writing at Oberlin College and earned her MFA at the University of Montana. Her work has appeared widely in journals and anthologies. She teaches fiction at Eastern Oregon University’s Low-Residency MFA program, Hugo House, and Gotham Writers Workshop. She was one of the National Book Foundation’s “5 Under 35” for 2015.

Rhonda Hughes is the publisher at Hawthorne Books in Portland, Oregon. Now in its 14th year, Hawthorne has published literary fiction and nonfiction to consistent critical acclaim and numerous awards. Film options and publishing rights to Hawthorne’s works have been sold worldwide. “If we specialize in anything, it’s in finding superb writing which might be overlooked by larger houses, and giving it the attention it deserves.” The Manzanita Writers’ Series has hosted other Hawthorne authors including Lidia Yuknavitch, Ariel Gore and Karen Karbo.

Prior to founding Hawthorne, Ms. Hughes had an extensive career in book production and printing. She holds a Master of Arts in English Literature and completed the Yale Publishing Course.

There will be no Open Mic session for this special event.

Admission for the evening reading is $7.

Kruse will present a writing workshop during the day on “Crafting Emotion.”

Learn how to use object potential and transcendent details to create work that resonates deeply with the reader. Megan Kruse will help students understand the craft tools that really make pieces feel affecting, almost magic. Useful to all genres.

The workshop will be held from 1 to 3:30 pm on July 16. The fee is $30; register here.

 

Manzanita Writers’ Series Features Nicole Hardy on May 21st

nicole hardyNicole Hardy will read from her memoir, Confessions of a Latter-Day Virgin, at 7pm at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on Saturday, May 21, 2016, with a writing workshop during the day.

“Her struggle between trying to be the woman her community expects her to become and her growing conviction that she must be herself, is one I won’t soon forget.” –Suzanne Morrison, author of Yoga Bitch.

Hardy’s memoir was a finalist for the 2014 Washington State Book Award. Her other books include the poetry collections This Blonde and Mud Flap Girl’s XX Guide to Facial Profiling–a chapbook of pop-culture inspired sonnets. Her work has appeared in many literary journals and newspapers including The New York Times, and has been adapted for radio and stage. Her essay “Single, Female, Mormon, Alone” was noted in 2012’s “Best American Essays.”

Hardy earned her MFA at the Bennington College Writing Seminars, and serves on the Board of Directors at Mineral School Artist Residency.

During the day Saturday, from 1 to 4 p.m., she will lead a workshop: Writing Our Personal Stories.  Students will divide their time among lecture, discussion, and writing exercises to delve into the art of creating memoir from memory. Nicole will pass on lessons learned the hard way, show samples from other authors, and explain how novelists’ techniques can be useful in writing memoir.

Registration fee for the workshop is $30. THE WORKSHOP IS FULL.

Following Hardy’s reading and Q&A in the evening, we’ll have our popular Open Mic where up to nine local or visiting writers will read 5 minutes of their original work. The suggested (not required) theme for the evening’s Open Mic is “Confessions.” Admission for the evening reading is $7.

Thor Hanson to Lead Writing Workshop on Observation

thor hansonSeeing Things – The Journey from Vision to Words

As writers we dwell in a place between observation and words, translating experience to the page in a way that is real to our readers.  But how do we do it?  What happens between the senses and the hand that holds the pen?

Join author and biologist Thor Hanson for an exploration of the art and craft of truly seeing things:  why it is essential to writing, why we are born to do it, and why a frog doesn’t need a brain to catch a fly.

The workshop runs from 1 to 3:30 pm and tuition is $30.  Click here to register.

Author and biologist Thor Hanson is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Switzer Environmental Fellow, and winner of the John Burroughs Medal. His books include The Impenetrable ForestFeathers, and The Triumph of Seeds, as well as the illustrated children’s favorite, Bartholomew Quill. Honors for Thor’s writing include two Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Awards and The AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize, and his many media appearances have included NPR’s Fresh Air, PRI’s Science Friday and The World, and The Current on CBC. Hanson lives with his wife and son on an island in the Pacific Northwest.

Thor Hanson will read from his latest book at 7pm that evening as featured author of the Manzanita Writers’ Series.

Thor Hanson will read from his latest book The Triumph of Seeds March 19

thor hansonThor Hanson will read from his latest book The Triumph of Seeds, at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on Saturday, March 19, 2016, with a writing workshop during the day.

The subtitle of the book is How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses and Pips Conquered the Plant Kingdom and Shape Human History. “Essential reading for anyone who loves plants, or who may have wondered how the chili got its spice, what puts the buzz in coffee, or how seeds have influenced everything from the voyages of Christopher Columbus to the Industrial Revolution to the shape of the human face.”

“Thor has done it again. In a page-turner, he tells the stories of seeds, their ecology, evolution and histories and why each of us every day depends on, relies on, delights in or suffers from seeds. This book will change the way you think about your coffee, your chocolate or even just the weed growing stubbornly (from a seed) out of the crack in the sidewalk. Because seeds are everywhere, a reality that you will never forget again after reading this book.”—Rob Dunn, author of The Wild Life of Our Bodies 

Seeds won the Pacific Northwest Book Award 2016, and was selected as a Seattle Times Best Book 2015.

Author and biologist Thor Hanson is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Switzer Environmental Fellow, and winner of the John Burroughs Medal. Hanson is currently pursuing projects on Tufted Puffins, native bees, and rare butterflies, and is involved in an international effort to assess the ecological impacts of warfare.  His books include The Impenetrable Forest and Feathers, as well as an illustrated children’s book and his work has been covered by news outlets around the world, including NPR, Reuters,Scientific American, The New York Times, and The Times of India. Hanson lives with his wife and son on an island in the Pacific Northwest.

During the day Saturday, from 1 to 3:30pm, Hanson will teach a writing workshop titled Seeing Things – The Journey from Vision to Words to help writers hone their observation skills to add detail to their writing.

Hanson will share an exploration of the art and craft of truly seeing things:  why it is essential to writing, why we are born to do it, and why a frog doesn’t need a brain to catch a fly. Tuition for the workshop is  $30. Register here.

Following Hanson’s reading and Q&A in the evening, we’ll have our popular Open Mic where up to nine local or visiting writers will read 5 minutes of their original work. The suggested (not required) theme for the evening’s Open Mic is “planting seeds.”Admission for the evening reading is $7.

Hoffman Center to Host Concert Featuring Music by Bob Dylan

Final Dylan Poster 11 072

Photo Caption: Author and musician Bob Shiel will present an evening of the music of Bob Dylan Saturday, Apr. 9.

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will host an evening of music by Bob Dylan Saturday, Apr. 9, beginning at 6 p.m. to honor the singer-songwriter and artist’s upcoming 75th birthday. Admission will be $10 at the door.

Chicago author and musician Bob Shiel will present his multi-media creation of live music, audience participation and discussion. It will include a rotating slide show of Dylan-related images and one song from each Dylan album in chronological order to demonstrate how his music evolved over the past decades.

Shiel, a retired English professor, wrote the book “61 Highways Revisited: The Albums of Bob Dylan” and created a two-CD album of Dylan covers. He uses both as educational tools to deliver presentations on Dylan’s body of work. They will be on sale at the concert.

“For any true fan, ‘61 Highways Revisited’ provides a rollicking, kaleidoscopic ride through the labyrinths of Bob Dylan’s half-century musical recording career,” said book critic and author Patrick T. Reardon.

Shiel’s website is www.BobShiel.com.

Bob Dylan’s 75th birthday will be May 24, 2016.

 

Matt Love Reads from his Latest: The Great Birthright, on March 5th

matt love on the beachMatt Love will read from his latest book, The Great Birthright: An Oregon Novel, at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita on Saturday, March 5, 2016 at 7 pm, with a writing workshop during the day. The reading is a special event of the Manzanita Writers’ Series.

In his fiction debut, Love bends and twists the detective novel genre with hilarious, unexpected and political results. The premise: a Los Angeles developer is trying to privatize Oregon’s publicly-owned beaches, its vaunted “great birthright,” and only one washed-up detective and self published writer can stop him.

“When readers finish this novel,” said Love, “I hope they are ready to go to war to protect our beaches.” Especially to protect them from what Love calls “the New Jersey and Malibufication of Oregon’s beaches: boardwalks, espresso stands, security guards, fences, no dogs, no bonfires, no fort building, NO TRESPASSING signs.”

The Great Birthright includes Love’s call to action for Oregonians to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Beach Bill on July 7, 2017.

Love grew up in Oregon City and is a lifelong educator and publisher of Nestucca Spit Press. He’s the author/editor of 14 books about Oregon, including the Beaver State and Newport Trilogies. In 2009, Love won the Oregon Literary Arts’ Stewart H. Holbrook Literary Legacy Award for his contributions to Oregon history and literature. He lives in Astoria with his husky, Sonny. He’s currently working on a book about teaching.

During the day on Saturday, Love will teach a writing workshop on Getting the Writing Going, from 10 am to 3:30 pm. Tuition is $50.

Join Love to experiment with innovative techniques to define an editorial voice for fiction or nonfiction writing and address the barriers that prevent the aspiring writer from getting started. Click here to register.

Following Love’s reading and Q&A in the evening, we’ll have our popular Open Mic where up to nine local or visiting writers will read 5 minutes of their original work. The suggested (not required) theme for the evening’s Open Mic is “on the beach.” Admission for the evening reading is $7.

 

Manzanita Writers’ Series 2016 Offers Expanded Workshop Line-up

coaster 14Get a mini-MFA in Manzanita, or at least expand your craft.

The 2016 Manzanita Writers’ Series provides an expanded opportunity for local and visiting writers to attend writing workshops taught by experts. No need to drive to Portland or sign up for a long-term college program.

The 2016 series offers a wide variety of writing workshops, from craft to the business side of publishing, from personal essay to humor to poetry to writing outside the box.

February kicks things off with Mining Your Life for Laughs with Bob Balmer on February 6.

Saturday, February 20, you can learn how to Craft a Strong Book Proposal with longtime Literary Agent Chip MacGregor, from 9 to 12. Then dive into craft from 1 to 3 with a workshop on Personal Essay writing with Ellen Urbani.

Do you find yourself talking about writing more than writing? Join Matt Love on March 5 for his workshop titled Getting the Writing Going.

And that’s just the first few workshops.  See all workshops to address issues like:

  • Want to learn how to find the laughter in life and craft it into your writing?
  • Do your personal essays lack attention-getting openers, truth-telling, brevity, and kick-ass summations?
  • Does your work need more in-depth observation of the world to translate it onto the page?
  • Do you know how to create a narrative for an object that can be backstory shorthand, enhance storytelling, help eliminate pages of narration and aid in telling a more layered tale?
  • Do you want to learn to use emotion that really make pieces feel affecting, almost magic, to your readers?
  • Do you find it hard to break out of traditional narrative structure to create what you want to say, how you want to say it?
  • You’ll find further details on the workshops offered and the authors leading them there as well. You can easily plan out a year of learning and writing to take your writing to the next level.

For a little added incentive, here are two ways to give yourself deadlines to write to.

1. The next issue of the North Coast Squid Literary Journal will accept submissions from March 1 through May 31.

2. Use our Open Mic opportunity at the end of each featured author reading as another deadline. This year we continue to have a “suggested theme” for Open Mic for each event. Writers are welcome to write to theme for their 5-minute piece although it is not a requirement.