Film Series Screens The Curio on June 23, 2017

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2015 feature comedy/narrative film “The Curio” Friday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

Filmed in Portland and directed by Dicky Dahl, the 88-minute movie is Dahl’s take on the conflicting demands of a struggling filmmaker trying to raise a family while at the same time following the path of an artist.

Dicky, his ex-wife, parents and brothers appear as themselves in the film, as scripted material, footage from the director’s married life, and interviews with family and friends paint the picture of a somewhat misguided late-bloomer experiencing all the freedom, loneliness and humiliation that come with having to start over when the bloom is off the rose.

“The Curio” is Dahl’s first feature film. His cinematographer was Scott Ballard, a number of whose  films have been previously shown at the Hoffman Center, including “Death on a Rock,” “A Standing Still,” and “The Black Sea.”

A trailer can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/68810889.

The ALIVE INSIDE movie — Art of Dying Series

ART OF AGING/OF DYING SERIES
ALIVE INSIDE
Tuesday 27 June | 3pm

Hoffman Center 

Michael Rossato-Bennett’s movie ALIVE INSIDE will be shown at 3:00 on Tuesday, 27 June at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Admission is $5. There will be a discussion following.

ALIVE INSIDE is the documentary about Dan Cohen’s amazing work of giving Alzheimer’s and dementia people music from their youth. Some instantly came back to our reality and were able to reconnect with loved ones. Some got up out of their wheelchairs and began to dance around the room. Some who rarely talked began to sing beautifully. Michael Rossato-Bennett does an excellent job of honoring these elders and their liberator, telling the story with many examples of the revitalizing power of music from one’s youth. Alive Inside was the most awarded documentary of 2014.

“ Gloriously inspirational” – Duane Byrge, The Hollywood Reporter.
“Alive Inside is a life changing film.” – Willian Brownbridge, Toronto Film Scene.“Joyous and unexpectedly uplifting.” – Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times.

We will have a discussion afterward lead by Kathleen Moore, therapist and grief counselor. Our Art of Dying discussions are always lively and interesting.

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/Art of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held
at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave).

For more information contact Kathleen Moore at moorewagner@nehalemtel.net.

Hoffman to Screen Documentary “Speaking of Dying” on Feb 28

The Art of Aging/Dying Series presents the film “Speaking of Dying” with a follow-on discussion on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 from 3 to 5pm at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita.

The Art of Aging/Dying Series will show a short documentary film titled “Speaking of Dying” created by Heartwork out of Seattle. There will be a discussion afterwards led by locals Claudia Johnson and Lane deMoll. Fee for the session is $5.

If you haven’t attended one of our conversational sessions before, this afternoon session is a great place to start.  Basic information beautifully crafted. This film and gathering promises to open up the conversation for all of us.

“There is so much taboo,” says Chaplain and facilitator Trudy James of Heartwork, “We live in a death-denying culture. In families where this has not been discussed, it leaves people in the position of making complex and difficult decisions without anything to go on.”

Far too many of us die in ways we would not wish to — often in ICUs, tethered to feeding tubes, in intolerable pain, or unconscious and unable to say a meaningful goodbye to our life and those we care about.

Viewing this film will inspire and encourage you to talk to your friends, family, health care agents and medical providers about your own end-of-life choices and wishes. “Speaking of Dying” will help you believe that your life can have a peaceful and meaningful ending that will be a gift to yourself, and to your loved ones.

The Art of Aging/Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue.) Further information is available at hoffmanblog.org <http://hoffmanblog.org> online or contact Tela Skinner,  telaskinner@gmail.com.

Hoffman Center to Feature Short Films by Teens

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen a selection of films created by teens from throughout the Pacific Northwest for the “Fresh Film Northwest” program at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24. Admission will be $5.

The dozen short films, shown as part of the Manzanita Film Series, were drawn by the Northwest Film Center of Portland from its competitions in 2014, 2015, and 2016. Entries were judged on Freshness & Originality, Persuasive Point of View, Emotional Impact, Technical Proficiency, and successful Risk-Taking.

 

Submissions came from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Alaska, and Vancouver, BC. Total running time will be 60 minutes.

The films to be screened are:

“Words Of Wisdom” (Portland)
A grandmother’s advice spurs a granddaughter into action. (4 min.)

“Leo & Clark” (Portland)
Young men compare notes on the pursuit of happiness. (5 min.)

“Home” (Vancouver, BC)
Abby’s strange powers help her find a world to call home. (8 min.) Winner: Creative Expression Award

“Abduction” (Vancouver, BC)
A story of abduction and lost love. (1 min.)

“Toccata” (Vancouver, BC)
Striving for perfection, piano practice turns to obsession. (3 min.)

“Living Honestly” (Seattle)
What it’s like to come out to families and friends. (7 min.)

“Losing Alberta: Gentrification in Northeast Portland” (Portland)
How gentrification has changed a Northeast Portland community. (11 min.) Winner: Integrative Learning Award

“What I Would Say” (Portland)
True feelings are revealed in hypothetical terms. (6 min.) Winner: Heart Award

“Buster Was A Man” (Everett)
What does it take to break out of a daily routine? (5 min.) Winner: Creative Self Expression Award

“Rectangles & Straight Lines” (Portland)
A cityscape full of patterns, shapes, shadows, and movement. (3 min.)

“Solved” (Portland)
Coming up with a solution under pressure. (1 min.)

“Shakesburn” (Portland)
A stolen tri-cycle, fruitcakes, and clever insults collide. (5 min.)

The Manzanita Film Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Films are screened monthly throughout the year.

Short Film Festival Returns to Hoffman Center on January 27th

The Hoffman Center for the Arts Manzanita Film Series will screen “The Best of the 43rd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival” at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Jan. 27. Admission will be $5 and refreshments will be available.

The collection of eight short films was selected by the Northwest Film Center of Portland from its annual juried festival. These films were made in Oregon, Washington, Montana and British Columbia. Total running time is 72 minutes.

The films to be screened are:

“Modern Dark” by Audrey Hall, Livingston, MT.
A young man attempts to view the Universe through a childhood telescope, but is met with the challenges of his Earthly world. (6 min.)

“Canned Fit” by Woodruff Laputka, Portland.
Internationally renowned sound artist Christine Shorkhuber uses an array of “non-traditional” instruments to create minimalist melodies. (8 min.)

“Censored” by Isaiah Corey, Seattle.
A man’s life is forever changed when his roommate introduces him to a product he never knew existed or even needed. (8 min.)

“Antipodes Rising” by Georg Koszulinski, Seattle.
Traveling through a mountain tunnel in Alaska becomes a portal for an alternate vision of the Pacific Northwest. (3 min.)

“Here Nor There” by Julia Hutchings, Vancouver, BC.
Nothing is what it seems to be when an investigator arrives at a funeral to speak with the family whose body he supposedly found. (15 min.)

“Primal Flux” by Joan Gratz, Portland
Colors and shapes shift and morph as images emerge and disperse in a play on the nature of conscious and unconscious communication. (3 min.)

“Ranger” by Sandra Ignagni and Trevor Meier, Vancouver, BC.
The Canadian vessel M.V. Northern Ranger has traveled the narrow straits and unpredictable weather of the remote Labrador coastline for the last 30 years. (8 min.)

“Me is Being Great” by Marshall Granger, Missoula.
When relationships end among the confusions of growing up, one might be able to reconnect to personal identity and be set free. (21 min.)

The Manzanita Film Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Films are screened monthly throughout the year.

Help Us Bring the Arts to Life: Donate Today!

More than ever, the arts play an important role in our community!

“I often tell my friends and former colleagues—from all over the country—that one of the best reasons to visit or live in Manzanita and the surrounding villages, is the fact that there’s a community art center here that is integral to the very spirit of the North OR Coast. The Hoffman Center is an ideal place to explore one’s creativity and make deep connections with others.”
~ Kathryn Stock, Nike Retiree & Manzanita resident

All of us at the Hoffman Center for the Arts are committed to providing an inspiring and welcoming place to explore, create, and connect with others.  Along with the many dedicated volunteers, we need your help to make that happen. 

More Programming than Ever
This year we’ve grown our programs, adding more classes and opportunities for people to participate in the arts. We are delighted to reach locals who enjoy frequent working sessions in the Clay Studio, as well visitors who come to the area for a writing or art retreat as a creative respite from their busy lives. Here are some notable accomplishments this year:

·     Added Clay Studio classes in techniques for beginners and experts; increasing the number of visitors along with the volume of visits per person and collaborative work on projects such as the totem installation in the Hoffman Garden

·     Increased visual arts classes in sketching and drawing, watercolor, encaustic, and more

·     Added more workshops as part of the Manzanita Writers’ Series and increased the size of our North Coast Squid literary journal

·     Introduced a new community-driven discussion series:  The Art of Aging & The Art of Dying

·     Expanded our art shows—including a new Quilt & Fiber Arts Show and the Kathleen Ryan Art Retrospective Exhibit—and began offering Open Gallery hours on Fridays

Continuing the Momentum:  2017 & Beyond
With your help
, we’ll continue to develop valuable programming that meets the interests of our community. We’ll also continue to strengthen the organization by adding talent to our board and operating committees, further improving processes, and managing our finances with a goal to accelerate paying down our mortgage.

To be successful going forward, we need you to be a part of this important work.. Whether it’s a yearly membership of $25 or more, a sustaining donation of $50 or more per month or a one-time donation, every contribution ensures our continued high-quality programming and gets us closer to our long-term goals.

Please contact us at hoffmancenter@nehalemtel.net or 503-368-3846 if you have any questions or would like to discuss your donation with a member of our Board.

Get ready for A Dark and Stormy Night – Mystery Weekend in Manzanita

4f7a9b905a1bc2d6c97e5c8f0157ee9d_fullIt’s going to be another dark and stormy weekend in Manzanita, November 18 – 20, a Mystery Weekend which promises even more twists and turns than last year’s inaugural event.
Sponsored by the Hoffman Center for the Arts, North Tillamook Library, Riverbend Players, NCRD Center for Performing Arts and CART’M, mystery enthusiasts can partake in a variety of activities over the three-days. According to event coordinator Madeline Olson, there’s something for everyone.
“What started as a mystery book sale at the North Tillamook Library in Manzanita two years ago expanded the following year to include more mystery-related events along with additional collaborators interested in establishing a fall shoulder-season event,” Olson explained. “This year promises even more fun with more activities.”

Mystery Weekend II kicks off Friday, Nov. 18 with two evening events. The Riverbend Players present “Dead Give Away” at 7 p.m. at the NCRD Center for Performing Arts in nearby Nehalem. Admission is $15. At 7:30 in Manzanita the Hoffman Center for the Arts is host to a mystery movie presentation of “If There’s A Hell Below” at 7:30 p.m. at a cost of $5 at the door.
On Saturday, Nov. 19, mystery activities include a mystery version of Story Time for Children featuring “Where’s My Teddy,” by Jez Alborough, at 11 a.m. at the North Tillamook Library, 571 Laneda Ave. in Manzanita. The first 10 families attending the event will receive a free book.

“Taking Your Mystery Recycling” is the theme of an all-day free event at CART’M from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., while NCRD, by popular demand, is host to a Live Clue Experience, a family-oriented whodunnit with prizes and snacks from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Hoffman Center events on Saturday include a Writing Scary workshop by author Cat Winters from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Pre-register on the Hoffman blog. Cost is $30. Winters will read from her new novel “Yesternight” at 7 p.m. at the Hoffman Center, which will be followed by the Writer’s Series Open Mic with the theme “It Was A Dark & Stormy Night” for those wishing to share their creations. Admission is $7 at the door.

Mystery Weekend wraps up on Sunday, the 20th, with the Mystery Book Sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the North Tillamook Library featuring gently used mystery books with proceeds helping to support library building maintenance. And, if you missed the Riverbend Players presentation of “Dead Give Away,” at the NCRD Center for Performing Arts, you have another opportunity at 2 p.m.

Film Series Presents “If There’s A Hell Below”

if-theres-a-hell-below-graphic-wThe Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the acclaimed 2016 independent feature thriller “If There’s a Hell Below” Friday, Nov. 18 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5. The presentation is part of the Dark and Stormy Mystery Weekend in Manzanita.

Abe, a young journalist at an independent Chicago weekly, has a lead on a story that could make his career. Debra, a woman claiming to work in national security, has some serious information to leak. She insists on meeting Abe in a desolate place in the American West.

The tension rises as it becomes obvious that somebody or some organization doesn’t want the information to be passed along.

Directed by Nathan Williams of Portland, the film stars Conner Marx, Mark Carr, Carol Roscoe, and Paul Budraitis. It was shot in eastern Washington and lasts 94 minutes.

The film was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize at the 2016 Slamdance Film Festival for Best Narrative Feature in Park City, Utah. The Manzanita Film Series screened four shorts by Williams in May 2016.

Williams will attend the screening in Manzanita to discuss his film.

The Film Series is one of the many events of the Manzanita Mystery Weekend, a collaboration with the North Tillamook County Library, the North County Recreational District, and CARTM.

 

Showing of Griefwalker

griefwalker imageJoin us October 11 from 3-5 at the Hoffman Center for the Arts for the showing of Griefwalker, a film about Stephen Jenkinson. A Canadian, he has spent 25 years in what he calls the “death trade, working in care. He now runs the Orphan School of Wisdom which one of our locals has attended.
 A number of us have heard him speak in the past year. Engaging, thoughtful and wise, his premise is that we must pay attention to how we live and that will affect how we die. There will be time for discussion after the showing of the film.
Suggested donation $5

Manzanita Film Series Goes International

wandering_reel

The Wandering Reel Traveling Film Festival returns to Manzanita Thursday, Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m. with a collection of four short international films at Hoffman Center for the Arts. Michael Harrington, director/curator of the festival, will attend the event to offer a Q&A session. Admission will be $5 at the door, and the program will last about 90 minutes

Built around the theme of “Postmodern Fairy Tales,” the program features films that are twists on old parables, exploring themes for a mature audience, including grief, loss of innocence, and the blurred lines of dreams giving way to fantasy.

 

The five films to be shown are:

“The Girl, Whose Shadow Reflects the Moon” (Jordan): Directed by Walaa.
A 14-year-old girl recounts her journey from Syria to Jordan, and how filmmaking enables her to voice her story.

“Sacha the Bear” (France): Directed by Henri Desaunay.
A playful adaptation of the fairy tale Goldilocks and the Three Bears, except this time the bear comes to visit her.

“A Doll’s House” (Denmark): Directed by Tobias Gundorff Boesen.
Nora lives a perfect life, in her perfect home, with her perfect husband, Helmer. But all is what it looks to be, and outside the safe walls of the dollhouse, a disillusioned little girl struggles to make sense of her parents’ relationship.

“From the Stars” (Norway): Directed by Kristian Landmark.
On an ordinary cold winter day, a small meteor suddenly bursts through Gustav’s outhouse. If the shocking experience isn’t enough, the little black stone exhibits a life of its own.

“The Living Also Cry” (Switzerland/Portugal): Directed by Basil Da Cunha.
As he enviously watches the ships he will never board, a Lisbon dockworker dreams of leaving his family and traveling to Sweden, but his wife finds his hidden money and has other ideas.

More information on the Wandering Reel program is available online at www.wanderingreel.org.