International Short Films Return to Manzanita

 

The Wandering Reel Traveling Film Festival
Friday, Feb. 23 | 7:30pm
Admission: $5 at the door
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Ave | Manzanita, OR 97130

 

 

The Wandering Reel Traveling Film Festival returns to Manzanita Friday, Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m., with a collection of six short international films at the Hoffman Center for the Arts. Michael Harrington, director/curator of the festival, will attend the event to offer a Q&A session. Admission will be $5 at the door.

Built around the theme “You, Me We,” the program features films about the issues that can tear people apart or bring them together. The films to be shown are:

“Mare Nostrum” Directed by Rana Kazkaz & Anas Khalaf (France/Syria)
 On a Mediterranean shore a Syrian father makes a decision that puts his daughter’s life at risk. (Narrative: 13:24 min.)

 “What Tears Us Apart” Directed by Hu Wei (France)
In a luxurious Parisian apartment, after a long separation, an encounter. (Narrative: 18 min.)

“Artalde” Directed by Asier Altuna (Basque Spain)
A shepherd, lost in the city, searches for his flock. (Narrative: 8 min.)

“White Face” Directed by Mtume Gant (United States)
New York actor Charles Rodgers hates his black skin and all the hardship that comes with it. Feeling trapped by his race, Rodgers feels he has found the solution to his problems – change his appearance to embody “Whiteness.” (Narrative: 21:16 min.)

“Light Sight” Directed by Seyed M. Tabatabaei (Iran)
Imprisoned in a room, a character is attracted to a hanging light and tries to catch it. But the room itself becomes an obstacle on his way. (Animation: 7:34 min.)

“The Sugaring Off” Directed by Alexandre Isabelle (Canada)
An austere man, Bernard’s sole occupation is to care for his beloved Line who is very ill. Their son organizes a sugaring off party that forces Bernard to reconnect with the exhilaration of spring. (Narrative: 14:57 min.)

More information on the Wandering Reel program is available online at www.wanderingreel.org.

 

African Safari to Kenya

A visit to Kenya with Lynne Gross
Thursday, March 8 | 7pm
Admission: $5
Hoffman Center for the Arts
594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita

A visit to Kenya through picture and narrative by Lynne Gross will be offered on Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 7 p.m. at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Admission for the event is $5.

Nehalem resident Lynne Gross, owner of the business Eagle Tours Kenya, has been arranging safaris to Kenya since 2012, creating customized trips and accompanying clients on the journeys.

“Kenya is my happy place and, no matter how many times I go on safari, I always have a new appreciation for the happy native people and the magnificent animals” says Ms. Gross. “Every person who has gone on one of these trips says it is one of the most wonderful experiences of their life.”

The photos and presentation will take attendees on a virtual safari visiting the geography, the culture, the people and the wildlife of Kenya, including a look at the iconic wildebeest migration.

“Travelogue Kenya Safari” is the fourth in a series of photography shows sponsored by the Hoffman Center to celebrate global culture and community through the lens of our local citizens.

Refreshments will be served and a discussion will follow the presentation.

 

Northwest Short Films Return to the Hoffman

The Best of the 44th Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival
January, 26 | 7:30pm

Admission: $5
Hoffman Center for the Arts | 594 Laneda, Manzanita

The Hoffman Center for the Arts Manzanita Film Series will screen “The Best of the 44th Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival” Friday, Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

The collection of eight short films was selected by the Northwest Film Center in Portland from its annual juried festival. The works were shot in Oregon, Washington, or British Columbia. Total running time will be about 90 minutes.

Ben Popp, Filmmaker Services Manager and Programmer for the Northwest Film Center, will attend the screening to discuss both the program and the center

The films to be screened are:

“Dinosaurs in the Hood” by Long Tran, Renton, Washington. A cinematic adaptation of a spoken-word poem about negative representations of African-American men perpetuated by mass media. (4 mins.)

“Float” by Tristan Seniuk and Volneak Sip, Seattle, Wash.Rocky Mang, a Cambodian hustler in 1990’s Seattle, spends his day slinging cheap cologne at the corner store between persistent attempts to convince a local barista to go on a date with him. (24 mins.) [*Judge’s Award: Special Mention]

“Vestibular Matching Soundtrack” by McKenzie Blake, Beaverton, Ore.Advances in technology also create linguistic rifts. Having been born largely deaf, a cochlear implant has provided the director access to sound, but at what cost? (9 mins.)

“Lost Winds” by Caryn Cline, Seattle, Wash.Plant materials taped directly onto the celluloid of 16 mm film and optically printed create unique rhythms, patterns, and images. (3 mins.)

“Time Well Spent” by Aaron Bourget, Seattle, Wash.
A hard-working artist is unfairly critiqued. (1 min.)

“Do We Leave This Here” by Julia Hutchings, Vancouver, B.C.
A journalist travels to the Peace River Valley to speak to residents about their community, which will soon be erased by the completion of a dam downstream. (17 mins.) [*Judge’s Award: Best Dram]

 “CultureTrauma” by Jodi Darby, Portland, Ore.
Using clips from Hollywood cinema, religious films, newsreels, and home movies, a reflection on what it means to have come of age in the 1970’s United States. (11 mins.)
[*Judge’s Award: Best Essay]

“A Mew Hope” by M. David Koesters, Portland, Ore.
A star fighter and her cat, who doubles as spaceship, must escape an army of soldiers in their own furry ships, or else face the wrath of pug planet. (5 mins.)

The Manzanita Film Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita. Films are screened monthly throughout the year.

 

 

Acclaimed Documentary Woodsrider

Screening of Woodsrider
Friday, December, 15 | 7:30pm
Admission  $5

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2017 Oregon-made independent documentary film “Woodsrider” Friday, Dec. 15 at 7:30 p.m.

Tucked in the trees of Oregon’s Mount Hood, Sadie Ford, an introspective young snowboarder, camps alone, anticipating a winter of adventure and self-renewal in an acclaimed experimental, moody documentary.

Accompanied by her dog Scooter, her only constant companion, Ford snowshoes to build her nestled tent site, a place she feels more at ease than anywhere with four walls. Brief times in town provide breaths of social interaction and connection, but otherwise she chooses to spend time in solitude.

Striking a youthful yet elegiac tone, “Woodsrider” has been described as a meditative film about identity, home, and the way human experience echoes that of the natural world.

Directed and produced by Cambria Matlow, the film lasts 83 minutes. Matlow plans to attend the presentation of “Woodsrider” to discuss the film and answer questions. She screened her earlier film “Burning in the Sun” at the Hoffman Center last April.

A trailer can be viewed at https://www.woodsriderfilm.com

 

 

 

 

Hoffman Center Presents Horror Film for Manzanita Mystery Weekend

Portland-made independent feature film “Ekimmu: The Dead Lust”
Friday, November 17 | 7:30pm
Admission $5

As part of Mystery Weekend 2017 in Manzanita, the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the Portland-made independent feature film “Ekimmu: The Dead Lust”.

On a cross-country trip home a young couple make a late night stop in the unassuming town of Briar Creek. There they stumble across a mysterious girl lying along the dark roadside, with evil lurking waiting, planning, and plotting inside her.

When the two girls find that they are somehow psychically connected strange things begin to happen, and it’s only a matter of time before they can’t control the inevitable.

The following days will lead them to question everything, from their own existence to whether or not they have somehow opened a doorway to evil. The answers can be found in only the darkest of places, where the sins of the past become the sins of the future.

Shot in Portland and Colton, Ore., the film was written and directed by Andy Koontz, and stars Jeff Argubright, Carissa Becker, and Chloe Francis. Released in 2017, it lasts 74 minutes.

A trailer can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/157741245

 

 

 

 

Wandering Reel Film Festival Returns on October 20, 2017

The Wandering Reel Traveling Film Festival returns to Manzanita Friday, Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m., with a collection of five short international films at Hoffman Center for the Arts. Michael Harrington, director/curator of the festival, will attend the event to offer a Q&A session. Admission will be $5 at the door.

Built around the theme “In Between Us,” the program features films about the bonds that connect people — often in unexpected ways. The films to be shown are:

“The Tables” Directed by John Bunning (United States)
A look at the powerful connection between a pair of outdoor ping pong tables in the heart of New York City and the unlikely group of people they’ve brought together, from homeless people to investment bankers to gangbangers. (Documentary: 15 min.)

“Big City” Directed by Jordan Bond and Lachlan Ryan (Australia)

Making a friend on the ride home. (Narrative: 9 minutes)

“Into the Blue” Directed by Antoneta Alamat Kusijanovic (Croatia)
Thirteen-year-old Julija and her mother flee their abusive household to find refuge on an idyllic Croatian island where Julija grew up. Emotionally scarred, Julija is desperate to reconnect with her best friend, Ana. But Ana is in love with a boy and Julija is no longer a priority. (Narrative: 22 min.)

“Anna” Directed by Or Sinai (Israel)
It’s a hot summer’s day, and for the first time in years Anna, a sewing workshop worker, unexpectedly finds herself alone, without her son. She sets out for a free night, roaming the streets of her small desert town, looking for a man who can touch her, even just for one brief moment. (Narrative: 24 min.)

Zela Trovke (Basque Spain): Directed by Asier Altuna
Moritats are old folk songs about crimes and are typical of Central Europe. Zela Trovke is a moritat from Slovakia, which the Holland Baroque Society has recovered to include in its Barbaric Beauty program. Maite Larburu, the orchestra’s violinist, unveils the song’s hidden secrets. (Documentary: 13 min.)

More information on the Wandering Reel program is available online at www.wanderingreel.org.

 

Film Series Presents “How the Fire Fell”

Friday, Aug. 25 | 7:30 p.m
The Hoffman Center for the Arts 
Admission $5

Hoffman Center for the Arts will screen the feature film
“How the Fire Fell”

Inspired by true events, the drama follows self-proclaimed prophet Edmund Creffield as he gathers a flock of dedicated followers dubbed the ‘Brides of Christ’ in 1903 Oregon. As rumors surface of perverse goings-on inside the mysterious cult, angry families seek revenge.

Written and directed by Portland-based Edward P. Davee, the 91-minute feature stars Joe Haege, David Poland, Maren McGuire, Brighid Thomas, and Rachael Perrell, with cinematography by Scott Ballard. It was filmed in Corvallis, Hood River and Portland.

“How the Fire Fell” was an official selection of the 2011 Nashville Film Festival and the 2011 Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

View trailer

Screening of “The Maestro”

The Maestro
Friday, July 28 | 7:30 pm
Admission $5

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2016 Portland-made independent feature film.

The film tells the story of Felix Kruger, a contemporary eccentric young classical composer commissioned to write his first major ballet. His struggles with writer’s block and a drinking problem, however, jeopardize his music and threaten to destroy his relationship with his girlfriend and those around him.

Through a series of eye opening events, his music begins to reflect his own inner journey and transformation. It is also through the mentorship of his good friend Leonard, a 65-year-old retiree, and a surprising secret that Kruger discovers the power and importance of life’s simple things.

“The Maestro” was written and directed by David Lunday. He also stars in the movie, along with Dennis Fitzpatrick, Haley Talbot, and Robert Projansky.

Lunday is a composer himself, and has scored feature films, documentaries, instructional DVDs, and iPhone apps for over 15 years.

“The Maestro” was an official Selection for the 2016 Madrid International Film Festival and the Los Angeles CineFest. It lasts 86 minutes.

View trailer here

 

 

 

 

Film Series Screens “The Maestro” on Friday, July 28, 2017

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2016 Portland-made independent feature film “The Maestro” Friday, July 28 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

The film tells the story of Felix Kruger, a contemporary eccentric young classical composer commissioned to write his first major ballet. His struggles with writer’s block and a drinking problem, however, jeopardize his music and threaten to destroy his relationship with his girlfriend and those around him.

Through a series of eye opening events, his music begins to reflect his own inner journey and transformation. It is also through the mentorship of his good friend Leonard, a 65-year-old retiree, and a surprising secret that Kruger discovers the power and importance of life’s simple things.

“The Maestro” was written and directed by David Lunday. He also stars in the movie, along with Dennis Fitzpatrick, Haley Talbot, and Robert Projansky.

Lunday is a composer himself, and has scored feature films, documentaries, instructional DVDs, and iPhone apps for over 15 years.

“The Maestro” was an official Selection for the 2016 Madrid International Film Festival and the Los Angeles CineFest. It lasts 86 minutes.

A trailer can be viewed at http://www.lundaypictures.com/#trailer

 

 

 

 

Film Series Screens The Curio on June 23, 2017

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will screen the 2015 feature comedy/narrative film “The Curio” Friday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. Admission will be $5.

Filmed in Portland and directed by Dicky Dahl, the 88-minute movie is Dahl’s take on the conflicting demands of a struggling filmmaker trying to raise a family while at the same time following the path of an artist.

Dicky, his ex-wife, parents and brothers appear as themselves in the film, as scripted material, footage from the director’s married life, and interviews with family and friends paint the picture of a somewhat misguided late-bloomer experiencing all the freedom, loneliness and humiliation that come with having to start over when the bloom is off the rose.

“The Curio” is Dahl’s first feature film. His cinematographer was Scott Ballard, a number of whose  films have been previously shown at the Hoffman Center, including “Death on a Rock,” “A Standing Still,” and “The Black Sea.”

A trailer can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/68810889.