Learn from a Photo Pro: Workshop on May 14 CANCELLED

Agate Beach. Photo ©Randy L. Rasmussen. All rights reserved. One-time publication only. No archiving. Mandatory Credit.

Agate Beach. Photo ©Randy L. Rasmussen. All rights reserved. One-time publication only. No archiving. Mandatory Credit.

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO LACK OF REGISTRATIONS.

The Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will host a one-day photography class Saturday, May 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost will be $60 per person.

“Translate Your Vision Into Compelling Photographs” will be led by Randy L. Rasmussen, a former photographer and picture editor who worked for The Oregonian from 1981 through 2015.

“There are many ways to make more interesting pictures, starting from when you push the button to how you crop and present your images,” said Rasmussen. “I love to document the diverse forms and textures that our natural world offers,” he added.

The class is intended for adults with prior photography experience, able to either bring prints, or JPEG-format digital images on a USB flash drive. Following a morning of presentation, the afternoon will be spent critiquing up to four examples of each participant’s work and discussing how those pictures might be improved.

The class can accommodate a minimum of five and a maximum of 12 students.

Rasmussen has lectured at the Art Institute of Portland and was a long-time member of a Polaroid Art Photography Group. Prior to joining The Oregonian, he worked for the Orange County Register and the Associated Press in southern California. He started in photography at The Missoulian in his Montana hometown.

Interested persons can register for “Translate Your Vision” on-line here.

The registration deadline is May 9.

Questions about the class can be referred to Rasmussen at Randy@randyrasmussen.com

 

 

 

Hoffman Center for the Arts Launches “Open Gallery” Hours

gale art openingThe Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita will hold “Open Gallery” hours every Friday, from 2 to 4 p.m., beginning March 4.

The Center frequently has art shows on display throughout the month, but it is not open except during specific events. Local artist and former board member Peggy Biskar developed the Open Gallery idea.

“It was a shame that people didn’t know when they could get in to see our latest shows, so we created a special time each week,” she said.

Center volunteers will be on hand during Open Gallery hours to greet the public, discuss the artworks, and help with sales if someone is interested in purchasing one or more pieces.

Manzanita Writers’ Series announces the schedule and judges for the 5th Edition of the North Coast Squid Literary Journal

ink the squid button art v3Manzanita Writers’ Series announces the schedule and judges for the 5th Edition of the North Coast Squid, a Journal for Local Writing.

The fifth North Coast Squid literary magazine, which showcases work of writers and artists who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area, will be published in October 2016.

Submissions will be accepted from March 1 through May 31, 2016. Submissions are accepted for fiction, nonfiction (to include memoir), and poetry. We also have a Young Writers category. All submissions are selected in a blind judging by authors/poets outside the coastal area. Submissions of art and photos will also be solicited for cover art and inside art. Watch for coming detailed submission guidelines.

With submissions possible thru May 31, take advantage of all our upcoming writing workshops to help you submit your best work — workshops on humor, personal essay, poetry, and more!  Click here.  Also we have Writing Lounge every Tuesday from 10:30 to 1pm at the Hoffman Center, with a drop-in fee of $5, where you can get feedback on your writing from fellow writers.

Judith Barrington will judge poetry for the North Coast Squid. She is the award-winning author of four poetry collections, two poetry chapbooks, a prizewinning memoir, and a text on writing literary memoir. Her work has been published in numerous literary journals and anthologies. Her latest collection, The Conversation, resulted from one poem winning the Gregory O’Donoghue International Poetry Competition in 2013, which resulted in an Irish publisher bringing out her work in a new book.

Brian Benson will judge nonfiction. He is author of Going Somewhere: A Bicycle Journey Across America. Benson teaches writing at the Attic in Portland and is currently working on The River Signal, an original radio story written on a paddlewheel riverboat as it floats the Mississippi.

Cari Luna will judge fiction. The Oregonian named Luna’s debut novel, The Revolution of Every Day, a Top 10 Northwest Book of 2013. The book received great reviews from Kirkus, Booklist, BUST Magazine, and Portland Mercury and was chosen as Book of the Week by editors at Oprah.com. Luna is a graduate of the MFA fiction program at Brooklyn College, and her writing has appeared in Salon, Jacobin, PANK, Avery Anthology, failbetter, Novembre Magazine, and elsewhere.

Our Young Writer category accepts submissions in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for young writers age 18 and under.  The three best submissions, regardless of category, are selected by the editors of Tattoo Magazine, a national award-winning high school literary and art publication based in Shoreline, WA.

Magic & Mystery Art Show – Call for Art

mystery and magic art show header imageIn conjunction with the Mystery Weekend in Manzanita, a collaboration with the North Tillamook Library, the Hoffman Center for the Arts is featuring an art show celebrating the mysterious and magical. Artists are invited to submit up to three works on the theme, in any medium.

Submissions are due by Friday, the 13th of November. Drop off between 10 and noon or 3 and 5 pm, at the Hoffman Center for the Arts at 594 Laneda Ave, in Manzanita.

The show will be up from November 20 through December 14.

  • Artists Opening on Saturday,November 21 from 3 to 5 pm
  • Special viewing on Sunday, November 22 from 11 am to 3 pm, during the Library’s Mystery Book Sale

Otherwise viewing is possible during regularly scheduled events at the Hoffman Center for the Arts. Check out the show when you attend these fun, mystery-themed events:

  • Friday Night Flicks, screening of Cold Weather: 11/20, doors open at 7 pm, film at 7:30
  • Manzanita Writers’ Series reading by Rene’ Denfeld: 11/21, doors open at 6:30, starts 7pm

See calendar for more events.

Guidelines for Submissions:

New or existing art

2-D, ready to hang or 3-D

3 pieces per artist

25% of any sales to the Hoffman

Please complete the attached form for the submissions

Can Artists and Writers See Through Each Other’s Eyes?

birdsFifteen artists and writers are immersed in a unique creative experience this summer at the coast, trying to see through each other’s eyes in their own creative process.

They are taking part in a new program at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita.

Titled “Word & Image: A Dialog Between Writers and Artists,” the program paired artists and writers to create original pieces, each in response to the other’s work.

The Hoffman Center for the Arts is known for its variety of programming for all of the creative arts, with the Writers’ Series, Clay Studio, art workshops and shows, Friday Night Flicks, and musical events.

This summer, two women launched a program to combine two of those arts, spurring artists and writers to leave their comfort zones for this different kind of creative process.

Emily Ransdell is a poet with an MFA in Creative Writing. A past recipient of an Academy of American Poets Prize, she is currently a member of The Poet’s Studio at The Attic Institute in Portland. Deborah DeWit, a full-time painter and photographer for 35 years, has exhibited widely. Her work is included in many private and public collections throughout the Pacific Northwest.

“Writers have been writing in response to art for centuries,” said Ransdell. “We thought it would be interesting to try a modern take on the tradition by letting artists have their turn as well.”

Ransdell described the project as a spin-off of the Hoffman’s weekly Writing Lounge, where local writers create short pieces in response to various prompts, often resulting in works that surprise the authors themselves.
Whereas artists and writers usually generate works that reflect their own experience and vision of the world, this project compels them to respond to someone else’s vision of the world.

“This way of finding subject matter for an art piece is both similar and different than the way I usually work,” says artist Lori Dillon, “a lot of the time I do get inspired by an event, series of events, or my own poetry/writing in my head.  So the difference is that I’m being ‘led to create’ by someone else’s voice.”

“One key thing here,” adds Ransdell, “There are no rules. No set process. The artist and writer can choose to meet or not, discuss or not, share results ahead or not. The whole goal of this was for people to experiment.”

Everyone seems to be approaching it differently. Some have looked at other works by the artist and writer. Some met once to discuss, others not at all. Some pairs are exchanging process progress and results all along the way.

Artist Vera Wildauer and poet Phyllis Mannan were matched and chose not to meet or discuss their process.
“It might be good to see the original,” Mannan wrote Wildauer in an email, “but I don’t think I want to hear the background, at least not right away. I want to let my unconscious mind work a bit first.”

“I rarely work from a picture or photograph when I write,” Mannan added in an interview, “so this way of working was unfamiliar to me. I learned to closely study the nuances of a scene, to question the relationship between people and objects. I hope to use the process of careful questioning in future work.”

“I was immediately drawn to one of Phyllis’ three poems,” Wildauer describes working from the other direction, “since it included so many images and evoked so much meaning about the ‘real world’ versus faith — with some odd juxtapositions. I had a great time with it, finding mixed media to lend itself to the process perhaps more than other forms.”
Writer Aina Tonjes and artist Cathi Howell did choose to meet.

“I got two pieces to choose from,” says Tonjes, “and after meeting with Cathi in person one of them became much more relevant than the other. I did need to know what exactly moved her to put those shapes down, and without having talked about it I don’t think I would have been able to motivate myself to write.”

“I wasn’t sure how to best write about Deborah’s piece at first,” Ransdell said. The two coordinators are taking on the same challenge as all the participants. “I didn’t want to just describe. I wanted to evoke something.”
She remembered a technique that poet and teacher Andrea Hollander used during a PoetryFest workshop in Manzanita. Hollander had the participants choose six words and work from there.

“So I chose six words that Deborah’s piece made me think of and I’m working from those,” Ransdell adds, “It’s definitely a technique I’ll use again. I was surprised and pleased; it’s a different kind of poem for me.”

The thirty participants range in age from 15 to mid-80’s, and come from as far away as Long Beach Peninsula and Portland to those who live full or part time in Manzanita, Nehalem and Wheeler. At the evening event where participants were paired up,

Juleen Johnson attended via Facetime. Her husband held up an iPad so Juleen could see the audience and the event from her location attending the Iowa Writers Conference in Iowa City, Iowa.

The event has certainly paired up people who might never have interacted otherwise. 15-year-old writer Elizabeth Johnson brought her parents along from Long Beach, Washington, to meet with photographer Steve Jones, 61.

Artist Karen Gale said “the biggest surprise was to find how much my partner Deb Simmons and I had in common both in our styles and in our lives. We are the perfect partnership!”

Simmons responded in an email to the same interview question whether anything surprised her about the process with “the friendship that has formed with MY artist!”

“I think all of us feel like the bar is kind of high,” says Dewit, “I need to do something worthy. Plus it’s just one piece of art or writing, not one of many of your works in one place. And everyone feels a commitment to each other, to honor their work.”

“What a challenge this has been, what a stretch,” adds Simmons, “The bottom line is to come up with something ‘worthy’ of the artwork, which I admire and love.”

The results will be unveiled at an opening reception and reading at the Hoffman Center for the Arts on Saturday, August 29, open to the public. Each pairing will be printed as a frame-able art piece and offered for sale as a souvenir for people who come to the show.

The project might well become a recurring event. After all, it exemplifies the Hoffman Center for the Arts’ tagline and goal: Explore. Create. Connect.

And who knows, it might inspire other projects.  “This is such a unique event!” says Lori Dillon, “Now I’m thinking about the concept of pairing musicians and writers and visual artists.  Whoa, doesn’t that sound crazy and good?

Call for Submissions for Word and Image Project

word image logoSubmissions are now open for an innovative summer exhibit at the Hoffman Center in Manzanita. The exhibit will pair artists and writers to create original work, each in response to the other’s.

The “Word and Image” project will offer up to 15 selected artists and writers a unique creative experience, one that co-organizers Deborah DeWit and Emily Ransdell call “silent collaboration.”

“Writers have been writing in response to art for centuries,” said Ransdell. “We thought it would be interesting to create a modern take on the tradition by letting artists have their turn as well.”

Ransdell said that the project is a spin-off of the Hoffman Center’s weekly Writing Lounge, where local writers create short pieces in response to various prompts, often resulting in works that surprise the authors themselves.

“All creative output is in response to something — an idea, an emotion, or an image,” added DeWit. “This is not a ‘theme’ project, in which everyone is asked to interpret the same subject, but rather a way for each artist and writer to utilize their own personal point of view and style to interpret another’s creation.”

Word and Image is open to all artists and writers who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area. Interested writers and artists should submit three samples of their work via e-mail to hoffmanwordandimage@gmail.com.

The deadline for submissions is May 11, 2015. Selected artists and writers will be notified by Jun. 1 and paired off at a kick-off gathering on June 13. New work for the Word and Image exhibit will be due from each artist and writer by August 3rd, with an opening reception and reading to be held at the Hoffman Center on Saturday, August 29.

Click here for instructions for submitting words or images or by sending a message to hoffmanwordandimage@gmail.com.

A Hoffman Center team, led by Ransdell and DeWit, will select participants. Ransdell is a poet with an MFA in Creative Writing. A past recipient of an American Academy of Poets Prize, she is currently a member of The Poet’s Studio at The Attic Institute in Portland. DeWit, a full-time painter and photographer for 35 years, has exhibited widely. Her work is included in many private and public collections throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Liberate Your Art Sale

ArtLiberationFlyerWebLiberate Your Art!!!

It has been under the bed, in your storage space, in the closet, on your Mom’s wall,

Unappreciated, lonely, abandoned, ignored!

It time to ‘move it on out’!

Artists are invited to bring your art, your paintings, sculptures, prints, cards, ceramics, your excess supplies, your enthusiasm and your smile, etc. to the Hoffman Center on March 22 between 11 and 4 to buy, sell and trade for new wonderful expressions of local art! Or find new homes for your own.

In a festive atmosphere, everyone is invited to come purchase at possibly reduced prices, fine art and craft from: Janet Maher, Kathleen Larson. Dawn Shears, Charles Winkleman, Christa Grimm, Teresa Simmons, Glenna Gray, Ryan Pedersen, CHAZ, and Linda Cook! If you know any of these artists, you know what a treat this event will be!

Live music by Denise Drake, Noah Dooley and Gary, Michael & Craig of The Rhythm Method.

Update: All tables have been reserved.

Sunday, March 22, treat yourself to a fun and festive experience and feel the freedom it brings to “Liberate your Art!” Come shop, enjoy the community, and take home some new art for Your walls!

Writers and Artists: Submissions Due August 31st!

ink the squid submit buttonDon’t forget to submit your work to the North Coast Squid:  deadline is August 31, 2014.  

Plus, there are still a couple of spots open in the August 23rd Writing Lab.  

Contact Tela Skinner via hoffmancenter@nehalemtel.net if you’d like to join us at the Lab to get feedback on your submission. 
 
The fourth North Coast Squid literary magazine, which showcases work of writers and artists who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area, will be published in Spring of 2015.
 
Writing will be accepted in the following categories: poetry, fiction, narrative non-fiction (which includes memoir).  Final selections will be made by literary judges from outside the local area:  Deborah Reed for fiction, Lauren Kessler for non-fiction, and Lindsay Hill for poetry.  Click here to find out more about each judge.
 
The magazine will be expanded to include selections from young writers under 18 years old.  The three best submissions, regardless of category, will be selected by the editors of Tattoo Magazine, a national award-winning high school literary and art publication based in Shoreline, WA.  The magazine is advised by Andy Barker, a member of the North Coast Squid editorial team.
 
Art categories include black and white photos and line drawings. Art and photos will be selected by the North Coast Squid’s editorial team.

“We invite writers and artists to submit work that goes beyond beach and ocean themes,” said Kathie Hightower, co-founder of the magazine and the Manzanita Writers’ Series.  “While we love the beautiful landscape here, we would like to include more diversity in the submissions.”
 
Submissions for consideration are due August 31, 2014. Only electronic submissions are accepted.  For the full submission guidelines, click here.  To submit, click here or on the image included in this post.
 
Writers and artists can find copies of the current Squid available for sale in these coastal retail outlets: Cloud & Leaf Bookstore and Manzanita News and Espresso in Manzanita, the Beehive in Nehalem, the Trillium Gallery in Wheeler, Beach Books in Seaside, Jupiter Books in Cannon Beach, and Lucy’s Books in Astoria. Net proceeds of the $5 cover price goes to the Hoffman Center to help fund future issues of the North Coast Squid.

Eight (Local) Girls Taking Pictures

The same Saturday evening as the Manzanita Writers’ Series’ Whitney Otto reading,llama @ ocean edge October 19th, there will be an exhibit of photographs by eight local photographers.

The women showing their work are:  Christina Wilson, Julianne Staach, Kathleen Ryan, Andrea Mace, Lori Dillon, Linda Cook, Peggy Biskar and Mindi Bender.  The subject matter of the photographs ranges from local landscapes to travel images, all taken with a thoughtful, discerning and loving eye.

Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. to view the photographs followed by Whitney Otto reading from her book ‘Eight Girls Taking Pictures’ at 7:00 p.m.  Otto will also show a slide presentation of the photographers whose lives inspired her book.

Photo Salon Meets First Tuesday, April 2nd

rolleiCome enjoy some photo company to kick off a creative warm season. The Photo Salon meets on April 2nd this month at 7:00 pm at Hoffman Center.

Here’s the program:

–As always, you’re welcome to bring work to show
–Gene has compiled a video overview of popular alternative photographic processes including:
        platinum/palladium printing
kallitype printing
        wet plate collodion photography
pinhole cameras
These old processes are capable of making extraordinarily beautiful prints, aren’t that difficult to master and are used by many contemporary practitioners. The perfect antidote for folks who aren’t that wild about digital photography or who want to make beautiful objects that can hang on a wall and won’t disappear forever when the power is gone!
–Rumor has it Kathleen Ryan will show some photos from her voyage to Burma
–Walker Evans photos (printed from the original 8″x10″ negatives) taken in the deep south in 1935-36. Beautiful, haunting images.
–Local revival of the Corner Project??
One new thing: in order to contribute to the sustainability of Hoffman Center there will be a contribution jar at the meetings. Please donate as you are able!