One Month to Go! North Coast Squid 

One Month to Go! North Coast Squid Literary Journal Accepts Submissions of Writing and Art
September 1 – October 31, 2017

Get your writing and
art submissions ready.

Submissions for the sixth North Coast Squid literary magazine will be accepted from September 1 through October 31, 2017. Submissions are accepted for fiction, nonfiction (to include memoir), and poetry. We also have a Young Writers category (ages 18 and under).

All submissions are selected in a blind judging by authors/poets outside the coastal area. Submissions of art, photos and photos of sculptures will also be solicited for cover art and inside art, with final art chosen by a committee.

The North Coast Squid, a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and the Manzanita Writers Series, showcases the work of writers and artists who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area. The next issue will be published in April 2018.

Andrea Hollander will judge poetry. She is author of four full-length award-winning poetry collections and has been awarded many fellowships. For twenty-two years she served as the Writer-in-Residence at Lyon College, where she was awarded the Lamar Williamson Prize for Excellence in Teaching. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches workshops at the Attic Institute and Mountain Writers Series.

Diana Abu-Jaber will judge nonfiction. She is author of six award-winning books, her latest being Life Without a Recipe. Her books have been listed in top books of the year by NPR, the Washington Post, LA Times and others. She teaches at Portland State University and divides her time between Portland and South Florida.

Arthur Bradford will judge fiction. He is an O Henry Award winning writer with four books, the latest being a collection of short stories, Turtle Face and Beyond. Bradford is also creator and director of the acclaimed “How’s Your News?” documentary series, and the Emmy- nominated film, “Six Days to Air,” documenting the creating of the TV show South Park.

April Henry will judge young writers’ work. She is a New York Times-bestselling author of 21 mysteries and thrillers for teens and adults. She lives in Portland and will make a special visit to Neah-Kah-Nie Middle School and High School in October 2017 as part of her partnership with the Squid.

All work must be submitted electronically via the ‘submit’ button on the North Coast Squid page of the hoffmanblog.org and must arrive by midnight on October 31, 2017.

Writers are invited to submit one piece per prose (fiction and nonfiction) category and three pieces for the poetry category. Word length for fiction and narrative nonfiction (including memoir) is 1,500 words each. All work must be previously unpublished.

Complete guidelines on format are at hoffmanblog.org.

The Manzanita Writer’s Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts, a nonprofit dedicated to bringing arts, education and culture to the community. Information on all their programs is at http://hoffmanblog.org.

Liz Prato ~ Writing Outside the Box Workshop

Liz Prato
Writing Outside the Box
Saturday, August 12, 2017 | 1-3 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita

Saturday, August 12, 2017 | 4 pm
Cloud and Leaf Bookstore

 

The workshop, Writing Outside the Box will include Lecture and Guided Writing.

Let your creativity have free rein and write outside traditional prose structure! All stories and essays are different, so it stands to reason they don’t all require the same structure. In this class, we’ll break out of the standard narrative box and have fun exploring the forms available for telling your best story. Tuition is $40. Register using the Add to Cart button below.

Prato will read from “baby’s on fire” a collection of short stories at 4pm Saturday, at Cloud & Leaf
bookstore in Manzanita.

Prato is author of “baby’s on fire,” a collection of short stories. Her short stories and essays have appeared in over two-dozen literary journals and magazines. She was the Guest Prose Editor for the Summer 2013 issue of VoiceCatcher, and edited the fiction anthology, The Night, and the Rain, and the River.

Awards include the 2010 Minnetonka Review Editor’s Prize, 1st place in the 2005 Berkeley Fiction Review Sudden Fiction Contest, four Pushcart Prize nominations, and a Scholarship to the 2012 Sewanee Writers’ Conference. She began teaching at the Attic Institute in in 2008, and has taught creative writing for several literary organizations throughout Oregon.

Praise for Prato’s book

     “The stories are at once beautifully written and tremendously compelling—not to mention filled with characters so full of life that they feel as real as people we know.
A knockout collection.” 
Molly Antopol, The UnAmericans

Liz Prato’s characters blaze with humanity, sensuality, and hope. Her writing glitters and her stories push us to the edge: Prato rubs her people together until they spark, in a book that throbs with heart—and grips our own.”
—Dylan Landis, author of Rainey Royal

The Manzanita Writers’ Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue.) For more information contact Kathie Hightower,  kathiejhightower@gmail.com


Submission Period for North Coast Squid Opens on September 1, 2017

Submissions for the sixth North Coast Squid literary magazine will be accepted from September 1 through October 31, 2017. Submissions are accepted for fiction, nonfiction (to include memoir), and poetry. We also have a Young Writers category (ages 18 and under).

All submissions are selected in a blind judging by authors/poets outside the coastal area. Submissions of art, photos and photos of sculptures will also be solicited for cover art and inside art, with final art chosen by a committee.

The North Coast Squid, a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and the Manzanita Writers Series, showcases the work of writers and artists who live on the north Oregon coast or have a strong connection to the area. The next issue will be published in April 2018.

Arthur Bradford will judge fiction. He is an O Henry Award winning writer with four books, the latest being a collection of short stories, Turtle Face and Beyond. Bradford is also creator and director of the acclaimed “How’s Your News?” documentary series, and the Emmy- nominated film, “Six Days to Air,” documenting the creating of the TV show South Park.

Andrea Hollander will judge poetry. She is author of four full-length award-winning poetry collections and has been awarded many fellowships. For twenty-two years she served as the Writer-in-Residence at Lyon College, where she was awarded the Lamar Williamson Prize for Excellence in Teaching. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches workshops at the Attic Institute and Mountain Writers Series.

Diana Abu-Jaber will judge nonfiction. She is author of six award-winning books, her latest being Life Without a Recipe. Her books have been listed in top books of the year by NPR, the Washington Post, LA Times and others. She teaches at Portland State University and divides her time between Portland and South Florida.

April Henry will judge young writers’ work. She is a New York Times-bestselling author of 21 mysteries and thrillers for teens and adults. She lives in Portland and will make a special visit to Neah-Kah-Nie Middle School and High School in October 2017 as part of her partnership with the Squid.

All work must be submitted electronically via the ‘submit’ button on the North Coast Squid page of the hoffmanblog.org (http://hoffmanblog.org/north-coast-squid) and must arrive by midnight on October 31, 2017.

Writers are invited to submit one piece per prose (fiction and nonfiction) category and three pieces for the poetry category. Word length for fiction and narrative nonfiction (including memoir) is 1,500 words each. All work must be previously unpublished.

Click here for complete submission guidelines.

Click here to visit our Submissions page. (REMINDER:  Submissions open September 1, 2017.)

 

 

 

 

Writers’ Retreat in Manzanita June 2-4, 2017

Join us in beautiful Manzanita Friday evening June 2 through  noon on Sunday, June 4 for an inspiring and constructive writing retreat.  Learn more about the writing craft, as well as the business of writing, and best of all, have fun in one of the most magical places on the Oregon Coast—Manzanita.

Authors Jennie Shortridge and Megan Kruse will lead craft workshops on ways to build tension in your writing, metaphor, and making the setting feel real.  They’ll also take participants through a fast-paced “Promp-O-Rama” to help generate new work.

Rhonda Hughes, publisher and editor of Hawthorne Books, will join Megan and Jennie in a panel discussion on the business side of publishing.

To complement these topics, there will also be sessions on yoga for writers, tips for reading in front of an audience, and tools to help you commit to the writing life.

On Saturday evening Megan and Jennie will read from their latest works and there will be an opportunity for workshop participants to read short pieces as well.

Even with this extensive line-up of activities, there’s still free time for participants to go for a hike, beach walk, or even take a nap after a lunch at local favorite, Bread & Ocean.

This weekend retreat is just $99, if you register by May 22nd.  The price increases to $129 after that.

Included in the Writers’ Retreat will be a tote bag for you to carry your materials, plus a variety of offers and coupons from participating businesses in Manzanita.

Click here to find out more about Jennie Shortridge and Megan Kruse.  Click here for the complete description of the Writers’ Retreat.

Register now for the Writers’ Retreat by using the Add to Cart button below.

Claudia Johnson, Paula Sansum, and Lane deMoll to Speak About Death

Death: Ok it happens and sometimes not in a timely fashion.
So NOW what? A bit of Preparation Perhaps?

Tuesday, April 25th 2017 | from 3 to 5 pm
Hoffman Center for the Arts
Suggested donation: $5

Claudia Johnson, Paula Sansum, and Lane deMoll will guide us into and through a hands-on-session about what we can do now (like NOW) — you know, “just in case death happens”— because it does. The event is part of the Art of Aging/of Dying series and will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts in Manzanita.

There are so many stories of what folks had to do and go through after the death of a beloved. Some of us have been involved in just the last two weeks trying to piece important material together after the sudden death of a community member, searching for the wills, the numbers of relatives to call, computer passwords!

What are your stories and what must we do for the loved ones we will leave behind?

A cadre or network is emerging of those willing to help when a community member or one of our own family is caught unprepared – we’d love to expand our numbers.  Would you like to get involved?  It appears to be a calling….

And let’s actually write out some of those things (like how to find those wills, or papers or the phone numbers of relatives who live far away) for those who come to take care of us.

Bring pencil and paper and let’s do some work together.

Yes, actually do some work—help each other out…talk about all this — together.  It matters.

Conversations like this will allow us to engage with our deaths-our own Service – and those of our community beloveds, as well as address the legacy we will leave for the living.

Claudia, Paula, and Lane have each been actively engaged, providing guidance, care and comfort for those dying and their families and their friends for many years. With varied backgrounds in ministry, health care, hospice, spiritual pursuits and service they are often called when death is calling.

Feel free to write to Claudia prior to the gathering at claudiaejohnson@gmail.com

If you’d like to be on an email list for the Art of Aging and Art of Dying announcements, email telaskinner@gmail.com

The Art of Aging/Art of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center of the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Ave). For more information contact Paula Sansum, psansum@gmail.com

 

Jonathan White Shares His Book Tides

Jonathan White will read from his book Tides:
The Science and Spirit of the Ocean 

Hoffman Center for the Arts
Saturday, May 20, 2017 | 7pm

After nearly losing his 65’ wooden schooner in a large Alaskan tide, writer, sailor, surfer and marine conservationist Jonathan White vowed to understand the tide.  He knew the moon had something to do with it, but what exactly?  He thought he’d learn enough from a book or two, but the subject turned out to be far more complex, fascinating and poetic than he imagined.  Two books turned into three hundred — and ten years of research criss-crossing the seven seas to view the largest, fastest, scariest, and most amazing tides in the world.

His book mixes science, history, ocean lore and literary travel writing. He fills you in on various cultures’ ancient myths about the tides and scientists’ gradual discovery of what triggers tides’ rise and fall. He touches on rising sea levels triggered by climate change, the latest efforts to tap tidal energy for our electrical power needs, and more.

White has written for the Christian Science MonitorSierraThe SunSurfer’s JournalOrion, and other publications.  He holds an MFA in creative nonfiction, and lives with his wife and son on a small island in Washington State. He has served on numerous conservation boards  and committees, including the San Juan Preservation Trust, the San Juan County Marine Resources Committee, and the Northwest Straits Marine Conservation Initiative.

As founder and former director of the Resource Institute, a nonprofit educational organization based in Seattle, Washington, he spent eleven years building a seminar program aboard the schooner Crusader in the Pacific Northwest. Resource Institute sponsored weeklong seminars aboard the sixty-five-foot schooner, with subjects ranging from navigation, anthropology, and whale research to poetry, writing, music, and photography. James Hillman, Lynn Margulis, Gary Snyder, Robert Bly, Art Wolfe, and William Stafford were among the many who taught aboard Crusader.  Jonathan’s first book, Talking on the Water, grew out of these experiences.

                        “When I first received this book for a review I thought I would learn some neat facts for impressing people on trivia night. I was ready to learn, but I wasn’t ready to feel. Tides is poetry, prose, and practical science intertwined with incredible skill.” – BlogCritic

“White makes gnarly subtleties lucid, and has a sense of humor when confronted
with the technicalities of his subject.” – Michael Upchurch,the Oregonian

During the day Saturday, from 1-3, White will teach a workshop on Research and Writing: A Balance. How much research is too much?  Too little?   Discussion topics include how to conduct interviews, travel, note-taking, recordings, the role of patience and luck, and how to organize and manage research materials while writing. This will be useful whether you write fiction, nonfiction, memoir.

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40. Register using the Add to Cart button below.

 
Following White’s reading and Q&A in the evening, we’ll have our popular Open Mic where up to nine local or visiting writers will read 5 minutes of their original work. The suggested (not required) theme for the evening’s Open Mic is “Not Your Usual Ocean Story.“

NOTE: Admission for the evening reading is $7. This event may well sell out, so come early. Doors open at 6:30.

The Manzanita Writers’ Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts. For more information contact Kathie Hightower ~ kathiejhightower@gmail.com

Manzanita Writers’ Series Expands Offerings to Include Writing Workshops “Online and at the Beach”

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
Each online course (5 weeks worth of sessions) is $199.
The optional retreat weekend is $99.

Learn More & Register

This May, the Manzanita Writers’ Series expands offerings to include writing workshops “Online and at the Beach,” as part of Hoff Online, a new Hoffman Center for the Arts program that will offer writing and visual arts workshops.

In its ninth year, the writers’ series brings regional authors to the coast for author readings and workshops. To augment that program, Online And At The Beach will provide more in-depth instruction online over a five-week period. Students will be able to work on their own schedule as well as interact with the instructor and fellow students.

The initial series begins May 1, 2017, and culminates in an optional writing retreat weekend in Manzanita the weekend of June 2-4, 2017. Registrations open April 1.

Jennie Shortridge will teach “Putting Your Prose to Work” and Megan Kruse will teach “Creativity Catalyst”. Read more about the classes and register at our new Hoff Online page.

The optional weekend retreat will allow students to meet their instructor and fellow students, enjoy additional craft writing sessions on building tension even in quiet stories, and on the transformative power of setting and “stuff.” After a session on effective open mic readings, participants will have an opportunity to read their work at Open Mic. Optional activities will include “Yoga for Writers,” hikes and a fun Prompt-O-Rama (a new writing prompt every five minutes for an hour).

Jennie Shortridge

Megan Kruse

View author bios here.

The Manzanita Writers’ Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts. For more info contact Kathie Hightower, kathiejhightower@gmail.com

Publishing Your Chapbook

CLASS IS FULL

The Manzanita Writers’ Series presents a workshop “Publishing Your Chapbook: for poetry chapbooks, books of short stories/essays” on April 15, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m

We are currently enjoying a small press renaissance, with countless publishing options for emerging authors. From submitting to reputable chapbook publishers to creating handmade, locally printed, limited editions of your work, the world has never been more open to an author’s specific vision.

Join award-winning poet and literary agent John Sibley Williams for this hands-on workshop exploring the ins-and-outs of organizing and publishing your chapbook. For writers of both poetry and prose, “Publishing your Chapbook” will guide you all the way from inspiration to publication.

John Sibley Williams serves as editor of The Inflectionist Review and works as both a literary agent and Marketing Director of Portland-based Inkwater Press. He is the editor of two Northwest literary anthologies and the author of nine poetry collections, including Disinheritance and Controlled Hallucinations. A five-time Pushcart nominee and winner of the Philip Booth Award, American Literary Review Poetry Contest, Nancy D. Hargrove Editors’ Prize, Confrontation Poetry Prize, and Vallum Award for Poetry, John has an MA in Creative Writing from Rivier College and an MA in Book Publishing from Portland State University.

The workshop will be held at the Hoffman Center for the Arts and tuition is $40

Register online by using the Add to Cart button below.

Mary C. Myers, Med, BCC, to Speak

Art of Aging/of Dying series
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 from 3 to 5pm.

Legacy writing is the invitation and the opportunity to reflect on your stories and the meaning they convey, to write from your heart about what truly matters in your life. These are the treasures you pass on to future generations, your beliefs, wisdom and blessings.

An ethical will is a document written to communicate values and wisdom, history, stories, and love from one generation to another. It preserves who you are and what matters most to you. It’s a way for you to be remembered.

“I am passionate about legacy writing and creating ethical wills because I have seen the gift it is to writers as well as their loved ones, whether shared in the midst of life or at the end. We are story telling/story catcher people who make sense of our lives and our place in the world through story and through story we are able to share our deeper selves, our souls.”

— Mary C. Myers

Mary C. Myers served over forty years in ministry, including twenty-three years as a Board Certified Chaplain in acute care, hospice and outreach to the marginalized. Personal story has been the constant at the heart of her ministry. She is a Certified Legacy Writing Facilitator.

Join us to explore legacy writing and learn more about creating your own legacy letters and ethical will. Admission for the Hoffman Center is $5.

The Art of Aging/of Dying Series is a program of the Hoffman Center for the Arts and will be held at the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue.) Further information is available at hoffmanblog.org <http://hoffmanblog.org> online or contact Tela Skinner, telaskinner@gmail.com

Workshop: Writing the Food Memoir on October 21

The Manzanita Writers’ Series presents a writing workshop at the Hoffman Center for the Arts.  Sweet and Salty: Writing the Food Memoir led by Diana Abu-Jaber will be held on Saturday, October 21st, from 10 am to 12:30 pm.

Tell me what you eat, said Brillat-Savarin, and I shall tell you what you are. Lives are filled with stories and plots but none is juicier than the one told with food. Culinary memoirs are wildly popular, taking readers beyond memory into the senses—especially the deep pleasures of the appetite.  Food sharpens the focus, introduces universal themes, and endows writing with imaginative, emotional, and physical layers of complexity.

This workshop will look at ways to write life stories by peering through the culinary lens.

There will be writing prompts, exercises, discussions, and food. We’ll be tasting and thinking and comparing notes, considering all the ways that our connections to eating gives rise to remembering and inspiration. Come and see what you cook up. Bring your curiosity and your appetite, a sense of play and a sense of humor.

Tuition is $40. Register using the Add to Cart button below.